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U.S. Economy Creates 250,000 Jobs in October, Beating Expectations Again

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Council of Economic Advisers

New data released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) shows that nonfarm payroll employment rose by 250,000 jobs in October, far exceeding expectations by 50,000 jobs. The United States economy continues its longest, consecutive streak of positive monthly job numbers, with employment growth averaging 213,000 jobs per month in 2018—larger than the monthly gains in both 2016 (195,000) and 2017 (182,000). Overall, the economy has added 4.5 million jobs since the election of President Trump in November 2016.

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Presidential Proclamation on National Apprenticeship Week, 2018

Under my Administration’s policies, our Nation’s economy is booming and Americans have more opportunities than ever before.  Men and women from all walks of life are moving off the sidelines and into the workforce.  In this economic context, our country needs workers with world-class skills and abilities to fill vacant positions in the labor force.  During National Apprenticeship Week, we recognize the importance of apprenticeships in helping our country’s hardworking people develop the competencies that enable success in today’s dynamic, 21st century economy.

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Ronald Reagan’s 1985 Veterans Day Address

Official_Portrait_of_President_Reagan_1981

 

Watch: Ronald Reagan’s 1985 Veterans Day Address 

In 1985, President Reagan gave his Veteran’s Day Address at Arlington National Cemetery. With the Cold War a fresh threat, Reagan emphasized the importance of peace while insisting, “strength is a declaration that cannot be misunderstood. Strength is a condition that declares actions have consequences. Strength is a prudent warning to the belligerent that aggression need not go unanswered.”

This Veteran’s Day, we humbly offer our utmost gratitude to all who have fought to preserve the greatest country man has ever devised. While words hardly seem sufficient, we can offer this: we remember.

Here’s the full text of Reagan’s address:

A few moments ago I placed a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and as I stepped back and stood during the moment of silence that followed, I said a small prayer. And it occurred to me that each of my predecessors has had a similar moment, and I wondered if our prayers weren’t very much the same, if not identical.

We celebrate Veterans Day on the anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I, the armistice that began on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. And I wonder, in fact, if all Americans’ prayers aren’t the same as those I mentioned a moment ago. The timing of this holiday is quite deliberate in terms of historical fact but somehow it always seems quite fitting to me that this day comes deep in autumn when the colors are muted and the days seem to invite contemplation.

We are gathered at the National Cemetery, which provides a final resting place for the heroes who have defended our country since the Civil War. This amphitheater, this place for speeches, is more central to this cemetery than it first might seem apparent, for all we can ever do for our heroes is remember them and remember what they did — and memories are transmitted through words.

Sometime back I received in the name of our country the bodies of four marines who had died while on active duty. I said then that there is a special sadness that accompanies the death of a serviceman, for we’re never quite good enough to them-not really; we can’t be, because what they gave us is beyond our powers to repay. And so, when a serviceman dies, it’s a tear in the fabric, a break in the whole, and all we can do is remember.

It is, in a way, an odd thing to honor those who died in defense of our country, in defense of us, in wars far away. The imagination plays a trick. We see these soldiers in our mind as old and wise. We see them as something like the Founding Fathers, grave and gray haired. But most of them were boys when they died, and they gave up two lives — the one they were living and the one they would have lived. When they died, they gave up their chance to be husbands and fathers and grandfathers. They gave up their chance to be revered old men. They gave up everything for our country, for us. And all we can do is remember.

And the living have a responsibility to remember the conditions that led to the wars in which our heroes died. Perhaps we can start by remembering this: that all of those who died for us and our country were, in one way or another, victims of a peace process that failed; victims of a decision to forget certain things; to forget, for instance, that the surest way to keep a peace going is to stay strong. Weakness, after all, is a temptation — it tempts the pugnacious to assert themselves — but strength is a declaration that cannot be misunderstood. Strength is a condition that declares actions have consequences. Strength is a prudent warning to the belligerent that aggression need not go unanswered.

Peace fails when we forget what we stand for. It fails when we forget that our Republic is based on firm principles, principles that have real meaning, that with them, we are the last, best hope of man on Earth; without them, we’re little more than the crust of a continent.

We endanger the peace and confuse all issues when we obscure the truth; when we refuse to name an act for what it is; when we refuse to see the obvious and seek safety in Almighty. Peace is only maintained and won by those who have clear eyes and brave minds.

Each new day carries within it the potential for breakthroughs, for progress. Each new day bursts with possibilities. And so, hope is realistic and despair a pointless little sin. And peace fails when we forget to pray to the source of all peace and life and happiness. I think sometimes of General Matthew Ridgeway, who, the night before D-day, tossed sleepless on his cot and talked to the Lord and listened for the promise that God made to Joshua: “I will not fail thee, nor forsake thee.”

We’re surrounded today by the dead of our wars. We owe them a debt we can never repay. All we can do is remember them and what they did and why they had to be brave for us. All we can do is try to see that other young men never have to join them. Today, as never before, we must pledge to remember the things that will continue the peace. Today, as never before, we must pray for God’s help in broadening and deepening the peace we enjoy. Let us pray for freedom and justice and a more stable world. And let us make a compact today with the dead, a promise in the words for which General Ridgeway listened, “I will not fail thee, nor forsake thee.”

In memory of those who gave the last full measure of devotion, may our efforts to achieve lasting peace gain strength.

Thank you. God bless you all, and God bless America.

 

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Judical Watch : “Elaborately Planned” Caravan Brings Human Traffickers & Violent Gangbangers to Guatemala

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, according to Judicial Watch , the migrant caravan marching northbound through Central America is an “elaborately planned” movement that’s benefiting human smugglers and bringing disturbing numbers of violent gang members and other criminal elements through Guatemala, according to government sources in the capital city. “MS-13 gang members have been detained and coyotes (human smugglers) are joining the march with clients who pay to get smuggled into the United States,” a Guatemalan official told Judicial Watch. People from Asian countries waiting to get smuggled into the U.S. through Central America are also integrating with poor Hondurans in the caravan, a high-level Guatemalan government source confirmed. Among them are nationals of Bangladesh, a south Asian Islamic country that’s well known as a recruiting ground for terrorist groups such as ISIS and Al-Qaeda Indian Subcontinent (AQIS). “There are lots of dirty businesses associated with this,” Guatemalan authorities told Judicial Watch. “There’s lots of human trafficking.”

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Menendez Uses the Murder of 11 At Pittsburgh Synagogue to Bash Trump

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Newark NJ,  U.S. Senator Bob Menendez (D-N.J.), once again uses the murder of 11 innocent people at a Pittsburgh Synagogue to promote a political agenda and attack the president.  With out any information Menendez said Saturday ,

“We’re still learning more about the horrific mass shooting that took place at the Tree of Life Congregation in Pittsburgh this morning, but my heart is aching for the Jewish families who’ve been torn apart by violence on the Sabbath. Likewise, my thoughts are with the families of the first responders who bravely put themselves in harm’s way to protect others.

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Understanding Your Benefits Upon Retirement from The U.S. Military

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, After sacrificing your time and risking your life for your country, the U.S. military makes sure to take good care of its veterans by ensuring they have access to the benefits they were promised upon enlisting. Not everyone is properly educated as to how to best leverage their newly accessible benefits and can lose out on hundreds or thousands of dollars’ worth of claimable perks.

One of the most important documents for securing these benefits is the DD-214, be sure to have this document as well as photocopies of this document on hand for whenever they may be needed. Obtaining the document can be done by individuals by contacting the military directly or by employing a service like DD214direct to go in person to where the military keeps the DD-214 forms and obtaining a copy. The DD-214 denotes your official separation from the U.S. military, it is essential in benefit application process as well as when it comes time to prove your service to employers after you’ve exited the military. It contains all relevant information with regards to the circumstances of your term of service.

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FBI profiler that caught UnaBomber Ted Kaczynski Calls “Pipe Bombs” a False Flag

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, Jim Fitzgerald, the FBI profiler that caught UnaBomber Ted Kaczynski told Martha MacCallum that the pipe bombs could be a False Flag by the Democrats 2 weeks before this important election as a real possibility.

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Winning the Trade War Doesn’t Mean Victory

photo :US Dollar vs Chinese Yuan 1 Year Currency Chart (via XE Corporation)

Barring unforeseen circumstances, the United States will likely win the trade war with China. However, the end result may not be as great for the United States as President Trump and his supporters may hope.

When all is said and done, the United States will likely come out of this trade war as the unanimous victor. Economically, China simply cannot keep up with the United States when it comes to handling tariffs. Although both countries may see their exports suffer, the results for China will be much worse, given that 14% of the Chinese economy is dependent on exports to the US, compared to just 4% of the US economy that is dependent on exports to China. This trade imbalance will cause the Chinese economy a lot more pain than what their counter tariffs can possibly inflict on the United States. If China doesn’t take the necessary steps to end this trade war, their economy will suffer massively in comparison to the United States. Continue reading Winning the Trade War Doesn’t Mean Victory

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US Economy Ranked #1 on Global Competitiveness Index

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, The U.S. economy has regained its status as the world’s most competitive , for the first time since 2008, according to the World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Report. The U.S. scored 85.6 out of a possible 100. The World Economic Forum says the U.S. is the country closest to the “frontier of competitiveness,” an indicator that ranks competitive productivity using a scale from zero to 100.

“America’s vibrant entrepreneurial culture and its dominance in producing a competitive labor market and nimble financial system” partly explain its top ranking, the Global Competitiveness Report says.

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