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>Payouts for unused sick days vary in North Jersey towns

>Payouts for unused sick days vary in North Jersey towns


Here’s a breakdown of data provided by Christie’s office for the obligation in each town in Bergen County:

Allendale – no obligation

Alpine – total obligation, $850,523.00; obligation per taxpayer, $1,169.46

Bergenfield – total obligation, $701,579.00; obligation per taxpayer, $83.44

Bogota – total obligation, $398,360.00; obligation per taxpayer, $162.76

Carlstadt – no obligation

Cliffside Park – total obligation, $100,000.00; obligation per taxpayer, $13.27

Closter – total obligation, $1,704,092.00; obligation per taxpayer, $549.02

Cresskill – total obligation, $319,192.00; obligation per taxpayer, $107.24

East Rutherford – total obligation, $1,101,518.00; obligation per taxpayer, $172.98

Edgewater – total obligation, $1,480,618.00; obligation per taxpayer, $266.69

Elmwood – total obligation, $2,004,685.00; obligation per taxpayer, $324.27

Emerson – total obligation, $400,926.00; obligation per taxpayer, $148.38

Englewood – total obligation, $5,353,655.00; obligation per taxpayer, $576.40

Englewood Cliffs – total obligation, $2,150,583.00; obligation per taxpayer, $793.98

Demarest – no obligation

Dumont – no obligation

Fair Lawn – total obligation, $1,635,758.00; obligation per taxpayer, $132.70

Fairview – total obligation, $1,473,045.00; obligation per taxpayer, $444.53

Fort Lee – total obligation, $9,225,587.00; obligation per taxpayer, $706.40

Franklin Lakes – no obligation

Garfield – total obligation, $2,692,885.00; obligation per taxpayer, $373.63

Glen Rock – total obligation, $1,004,087.00; obligation per taxpayer, $238.49

Hackensack – total obligation, $18,875,368.00; obligation per taxpayer, $1,030.51

Harrington Park – total obligation, $594,486.00; obligation per taxpayer, $356.08

Hasbrouck Heights – total obligation, $237,175.00; obligation per taxpayer, $55.77

Haworth – total obligation, $489,559.00; obligation per taxpayer, $370.61

Hillsdale – total obligation, $201,417.78; obligation per taxpayer, $56.48

Ho-Ho-Kus – total obligation, $1,283,024.58; obligation per taxpayer, $847.04

Leonia – total obligation, $551,626.93; obligation per taxpayer, $195.06

Little Ferry – total obligation, $227,896.00; obligation per taxpayer, $66.81

Lodi – no obligation

Lyndhurst – no obligation

Mahwah – total obligation, $2,033,561.94; obligation per taxpayer, $175.99

Maywood – total obligation, $140,840.00; obligation per taxpayer, $40.81

Midland Park – no obligation

Montvale – total obligation, $468,626.00; obligation per taxpayer, $129.63

Moonachie – total obligation, $552,913.00; obligation per taxpayer, $272.68

New Milford – total obligation, $2,738,820.00; obligation per taxpayer, $578.04

North Arlington – total obligation, $80,000.00; obligation per taxpayer, $17.53

Northvale – total obligation, $847,361.00; obligation per taxpayer, $402.78

Norwood – total obligation, $282,132.00; obligation per taxpayer, $135.63

Oakland – no obligation

Old Tappan – no obligation

Oradell – no obligation

Palisades Park – total obligation, $1,591,795.00; obligation per taxpayer, $328.29

Paramus – total obligation, $575,800.00; obligation per taxpayer, $38.45

Park Ridge – total obligation, $772,804.00; obligation per taxpayer, $230.36

Ramsey – total obligation, $2,425,192.27; obligation per taxpayer, $373.12

Ridgefield – no obligation

Ridgefield Park – total obligation, $678,973.00; obligation per taxpayer, $157.71

Ridgewood – total obligation, $7,203,566.23; obligation per taxpayer, $861.41

River Edge – total obligation, $733,050.20; obligation per taxpayer, $197.51

River Vale – total obligation, $1.00; obligation per taxpayer, $0.00

Rochelle Park – no obligation

Rockleigh – no obligation

Rutherford – total obligation, $3,620,854.00; obligation per taxpayer, $569.54

 Saddle Brook – total obligation, $1,295,495.00; obligation per taxpayer, $202.96

Saddle River – total obligation, $412,800.00; obligation per taxpayer, $318.05

South Hackensack – total obligation, $539,525.00; obligation per taxpayer, $320.47

Teaneck – total obligation, $4,379,922.16; obligation per taxpayer, $335.08

Tenafly – no obligation

Teterboro – total obligation, $94,299.77; obligation per taxpayer, $42.01

Upper Saddle River – total obligation, $986,895.00; obligation per taxpayer, $338.73

Waldwick – total obligation, $1,214,624.00; obligation per taxpayer, $324.61

Wallington – no obligation

Washington – total obligation, $567,071.00; obligation per taxpayer, $162.59

Westwood – – total obligation, $1,060,665.00; obligation per taxpayer, $247.79

Woodcliff Lake – no obligation

Wood-Ridge – total obligation, $1,417,724.00; obligation per taxpayer, $425.22

Wyckoff – no obligation

http://blog.northjersey.com/thesource/1768/payouts-for-unused-sick-days-vary-in-north-jersey-towns/

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>Plan to dissolve Teterboro Would Kill 3,700 Jobs Just to Reward Their Political Allies

>Plan to dissolve Teterboro Would Kill 3,700 Jobs Just to Reward Their Political Allies
By Mel Fabrikant    Thursday, October 06, 2011, 01:04 PM EDT

Driscoll/Goldberg/Alonso Call on Opponents to Withdraw Their Bill that Would Kill Private-Sector Jobs to Help Their Political Allies

Bergen Record’s Al Doblin: “Equivalent of Petty Thugs Pillaging a Community”

The 38th District Republican legislative candidates called on their opponents to withdraw their land grab legislation that could erase a $225 million economic development project, along with thousands of new jobs in Bergen County.

Republican Senate candidate John Driscoll and his Assembly running mates Richard Goldberg and Fernando Alonso, called on Bob Gordon and Connie Wagner to officially terminate their plan to dissolve Teterboro, a successful jobs haven in North Jersey. The Bergen Record called their backroom deal lunacy because it jeopardized thousands of new jobs and would impose higher taxes on existing businesses.

“This plan is a microcosm of the dangerous economic policies that Trenton politicians like Bob Gordon have supported. Their plan punishes success to reward political allies and that costs us jobs,” Driscoll, the Bergen County Freeholder Chairman, said. “Last year common sense prevailed and stopped this plan that would have killed a $225 million economic development project, along with 2,500 permanent jobs and 1,200 construction jobs.

http://www.paramuspost.com/article.php/20111006130403654

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>THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HAS ISSUED TORNADO WARNING

>THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN UPTON NY HAS ISSUED A

* TORNADO WARNING FOR…
PASSAIC COUNTY IN NORTHEAST NEW JERSEY…
NORTHERN ESSEX COUNTY IN NORTHEAST NEW JERSEY…
SOUTHERN BERGEN COUNTY IN NORTHEAST NEW JERSEY…

* UNTIL 815 PM EDT…

* AT 735 PM EDT…NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED A
SEVERE THUNDERSTORM CAPABLE OF PRODUCING A TORNADO 8 MILES WEST OF
WEST MILFORD…MOVING SOUTHEAST AT 45 MPH.

* OTHER LOCATIONS IN THE WARNING INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO
BLOOMINGDALE…POMPTON LAKES…WAYNE…FAIRFIELD…HAWTHORNE…
CALDWELL…RIDGEWOOD…PATERSON…PARAMUS…BLOOMFIELD…PASSAIC…
HACKENSACK…MORNINGSIDE HEIGHTS…TETERBORO…RUTHERFORD…
RIDGEFIELD…LYNDHURST…FORT LEE…ENGLEWOOD AND BERGENFIELD

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

WHEN A TORNADO WARNING IS ISSUED BASED ON DOPPLER RADAR…IT MEANS
THAT STRONG ROTATION HAS BEEN DETECTED IN THE STORM. A TORNADO MAY
ALREADY BE ON THE GROUND…OR IS EXPECTED TO DEVELOP SHORTLY. IF YOU
ARE IN THE PATH OF THIS DANGEROUS STORM…MOVE INDOORS AND TO THE
LOWEST LEVEL OF THE BUILDING. STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS. IF DRIVING…DO
NOT SEEK SHELTER UNDER A HIGHWAY OVERPASS.

THE SAFEST PLACE TO BE DURING A TORNADO IS IN A BASEMENT. GET UNDER A
WORKBENCH OR OTHER PIECE OF STURDY FURNITURE. IF NO BASEMENT IS
AVAILABLE…SEEK SHELTER ON THE LOWEST FLOOR OF THE BUILDING IN AN
INTERIOR HALLWAY OR ROOM SUCH AS A CLOSET. — USE BLANKETS OR PILLOWS TO
COVER YOUR BODY AND ALWAYS STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS.

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>Lost amid 40th District election battle – the issues

>

Lost amid 40th District election battle – the issues
Thursday, May 28, 2009
BY RICHARD COWEN
NorthJersey.com

http://www.northjersey.com/politics/Lost_amid_40th_District_election_battle__the_issues.html

The bitter primary campaign by Republicans in the 40th District Assembly race has produced a lawsuit, three election complaints and a lots of angry rhetoric — but not a lot of discussion of the issues.

Incumbents Scott Rumana, R-Wayne, and David C. Russo, R-Ridgewood, face a stiff challenge from two businessmen, Joseph A. Caruso of Wayne and Anthony Rottino of Franklin Lakes, both making their first run for the state Legislature.

Gaining a GOP primary nomination in the heavily Republican 40th District makes a candidate a heavy favorite to win the general election in November.

Challenger Joseph Caruso says he’s bringing fresh blood to the Republican Party, which he says has lost its voice even as the state budget has become a huge problem for ruling Democrats. Like the other Republicans in the race, Caruso blames the Democrats for a state budget that has spiraled from $21 billion to $33 billion in seven years.

“The Republican Party is broken in New Jersey,” Caruso said. “We’re a party in need of a major overhaul. We raise money, but our party has no message. Our party has no unique ideas anymore.”

Both incumbents and challengers agree that the state must make deep cuts in its spending to help New Jersey struggle past the economic doldrums. Rottino and Caruso are calling for abolishing the state’s business tax, now pegged at 9 percent, as well as a 20 percent reduction in state spending, which is favored by gubernatorial candidate Steve Lonegan.

“Every time you turn around, it’s getting harder and harder to do business in New Jersey,” said Rottino, a developer who also owns two Harley-Davidson dealerships and a health club in Teterboro.

Rumana and Russo agree that state spending must be drastically reduced, but they say massive layoffs of the state workforce are not politically feasible. They favor steady reductions in state staffing through attrition and consolidation of positions.

“You can’t just shoot from the hip on these issues,” Rumana said. “The difference between Caruso and Rottino and myself is that they’ve never spent a day in office, and I have. I’ve been a freeholder, mayor and assemblyman.”

Caruso and Rottino say eliminating the state business tax would free millions of dollars to be poured instead into new business investment. Russo agrees with the idea in concept but says the lost tax revenue would somehow have to be replaced or it would open yet another gap in the state budget.

“I agree that business taxes are too high,” Russo said. “Eliminating the business tax might work, but only if you can find revenue elsewhere.”

Caruso, 35, is the finance chairman of the Bergen County Republican Organization and owns a financial services company in Lyndhurst. One of his more radical ideas is to close the state Department of Environmental Protection, which he claims is strangling business with overregulation. He says the federal government could pick up the responsibilities for protecting the environment.

Rumana, 45, and Russo, 55, don’t agree with getting rid of the DEP but favor abolishing the state Council on Affordable Housing (COAH), which is responsible for imposing low-income housing quotas on municipalities. The quotas stem from Supreme Court decisions that communities have an obligation to promote housing for people of modest means.

As assemblyman, Rumana has sponsored several bills that would limit COAH’s powers. Rumana also has sponsored a bill to create a constitutional amendment to eliminate COAH altogether.

Caruso and the 43-year-old Rottino say they, too, would work to abolish COAH. They also favor abolition of the state’s Green Acres program, which buys up land from developers and preserves it as open space.

Rottino said it should be up to municipalities, not the state, to pay for open space preservation. Both Rumana and Russo favor continuation of the Green Acres program, which has exhausted its funding and will need to be replenished through a bond referendum. But because the state is so deeply in debt, Rumana said, it appears unlikely that the Green Acres bond issue will make it onto the ballot this year.

The political stakes are highest for Rumana, the freshman assemblyman who also is chairman of the Republican Party in Passaic County. Rumana took over the leadership three years ago, in the wake of a corruption scandal in which then-Chairman Peter Murphy went to prison for wire fraud.

Caruso and Rottino both have the backing of a political action committee, GOP Strong, started by Murphy.

Throughout the campaign, Rumana has sought to paint Caruso and Rottino as puppets of Murphy. But Caruso and Rottino say they are in the race to advance their own ideas and agendas.

E-mail: cowen@northjersey.com

http://www.northjersey.com/politics/Lost_amid_40th_District_election_battle__the_issues.html

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>Still true to this day ……..

>

Food Court (Formerly Ridgewood), NJ

Towns That Might As Well Go With What They’ve Got

By JIM TOSONE

Published in the Sunday New York Times on June 24, 2001

The Village of Ridgewood. A town of charming center-hall colonials, schools that are thought to be way-stations to the Ivy League, and restaurants that are rated Excellent. And restaurants rated Good. And restaurants rated Fair.

According to my count, Ridgewood’s business district has 61 restaurants—and 62 parking spaces. On a typical Saturday evening, you circle the block in your Jeep Grand Cherokee in search of a parking space, ready to swoop in for the kill. On the following Saturday evening, you finally find a space. If you’re an early diner, you must calculate the amount of money to put in the parking meter with same care you use when fine-tuning your asset allocation model. You then duck into the Ridgewood Wine Seller for a quick purchase, since many Ridgewood restaurants still have not figured out whom to bribe for a liquor license. And after the mandatory 15- to 20-minute wait in the doorway of your favorite restaurant, you’re escorted to a table.

The sheer number of dining establishments in Ridgewood has transformed the business district and driven out other types of businesses. Those who see this as a problem fall into three groups: town officials, who see everything as a problem except for the problems they create; restaurant owners, who do not see it as a problem until after they’ve opened their restaurant; and restaurant patrons, who somehow manage to believe this is a problem while complaining about there being “no place to eat around here.”

Ridgewood’s restaurant situation raises a larger question. Why should all New Jersey towns struggle to be all things to all people? Why not have each town dedicated to one industry? There’s precedence elsewhere: Orlando for children’s entertainment, Silicon Valley for technology, Miami for drugs. It’s Adam Smith’s idea of specialization of labor.

And there’s only one way to ensure the free-market principle of specialization of labor. We must mandate it, we must make any alternative illegal, we must carve it in stone for all eternity. So I’m looking for a visionary state legislator (stop laughing) who is willing to sponsor a bill that would:

o Require that all restaurants in New Jersey be moved to Ridgewood and that the town be renamed the Garden State Food Court.

o Require that a translucent dome be built over Paramus, making it the world’s largest indoor shopping mall.

o Require that all local public schools be moved to Princeton. We’re paying Ivy League per-pupil rates for our kids’ education, so we might as well get a prestige town name thrown in. To transport our kids to Princeton each day, the state will confiscate all private buses currently used to haul the elderly to Atlantic City.

o Require that Atlantic City focus all of its efforts and attention on the gaming industry, while letting the rest of the city collapse. (Strike that. It’s already the policy.)

o Require that all local and county governments be moved to Trenton. This, along with moving the public schools, would provide us with true property tax relief, since our property taxes would then be zero. Sure, our state income tax will skyrocket, but that’s going to happen anyway.

o Require that all antiques, with the exception of Frank Lautenberg, be sold in the town of Chester.

o Require that anyone moving from Park Slope live in Montclair. This way they’ll already know their new neighbors, who moved from Park Slope last year.

o Require that all airports in New Jersey be shut down except for Teterboro. If this happens, the time for a Continental flight to Boston would be about eight hours—a one-hour improvement over the current flight time from Newark.

Specialization has the potential to make New Jersey a paradise on earth. And to those who ask where all the cars bound for these towns are going to park, I have but three words: the Pine Barrens.