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Presidents Day Our Favorite Presidents :Abraham Lincoln

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Presidents Day Our Favorite Presidents :Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln became the United States’ 16th President in 1861, issuing the Emancipation Proclamation that declared forever free those slaves within the Confederacy in 1863.

Lincoln warned the South in his Inaugural Address: “In your hands, my dissatisfied fellow countrymen, and not in mine, is the momentous issue of civil war. The government will not assail you…. You have no oath registered in Heaven to destroy the government, while I shall have the most solemn one to preserve, protect and defend it.”

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Presidents Day Our Favorite Presidents : Ronald Reagan

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Presidents Day Our Favorite Presidents : Ronald Reagan

Ronald Reagan, originally an American actor and politician, became the 40th President of the United States serving from 1981-1989. His term saw a restoration of prosperity at home, with the goal of achieving ‘peace through strength’ abroad.

At the end of his two terms in office, Ronald Reagan viewed with satisfaction the achievements of his innovative program known as the Reagan Revolution, which aimed to reinvigorate the American people and reduce their reliance upon Government. He felt he had fulfilled his campaign pledge of 1980 to restore “the great, confident roar of American progress and growth and optimism.”

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Presidents Day Our Favorite Presidents : George Washington

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Presidents Day Our Favorite Presidents : George Washington

On April 30, 1789, George Washington, standing on the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street in New York, took his oath of office as the first President of the United States.

On April 30, 1789, George Washington, standing on the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street in New York, took his oath of office as the first President of the United States. “As the first of every thing, in our situation will serve to establish a Precedent,” he wrote James Madison, “it is devoutly wished on my part, that these precedents may be fixed on true principles.”

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Presidents Day Our Favorite Presidents Calvin Coolidge

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Presidents Day Our Favorite Presidents Calvin Coolidge

As America’s 30th President (1923-1929), Coolidge demonstrated his determination to preserve the old moral and economic precepts of frugality amid the material prosperity which many Americans were enjoying during the 1920s era.

At 2:30 on the morning of August 3, 1923, while visiting in Vermont, Calvin Coolidge received word that he was President. By the light of a kerosene lamp, his father, who was a notary public, administered the oath of office as Coolidge placed his hand on the family Bible.

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Presidents Day Our Favorite Presidents : Zachary Taylor

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Presidents Day Our Favorite Presidents : Zachary Taylor

Zachary Taylor, a general and national hero in the United States Army from the time of the Mexican-American War and the the War of 1812, was later elected the 12th President of the United States, serving from March 1849 until his death in July 1850.

Northerners and Southerners disputed sharply whether the territories wrested from Mexico should be opened to slavery, and some Southerners even threatened secession. Standing firm, Zachary Taylor was prepared to hold the Union together by armed force rather than by compromise.

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Black History Month : Black Rights and the Constitution

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A statue in honor of the black soldiers of the American Revolution

Black History Month : Black Rights and the Constitution
part of a much larger article http://iusbvision.wordpress.com/2011/01/24/black-heroes-and-founders-of-the-great-american-revolution/
By The Founders:

‎”When the Constitution of the United States was framed, colored men voted in a majority of these States; they voted in the State of New York, in Pennsylvania, in Massachusetts, in Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Delaware and North Carolina; and long after the adoption of the Constitution, they continued to vote in North Carolina and Tennessee also. The Constitution of the United States makes no distinction of color.”

~ The Colored Patriots of the American Revolution by Wm Cooper Neil & Harriet Beecher Stowe 1855

In fact, a number of state constitutions protected voting rights for blacks. The state constitutions of Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania (all 1776), New York (1777), Massachusetts (1780), and New Hampshire (1784) included black suffrage. In 1874, Robert Brown Elliot, a member of the House of Representatives from South Carolina and a black man, stated ”When did Massachusetts sully her proud record by placing on her statute-book any law which admitted to the ballot the white man and shut out the black man? She has never done it; she will not do it.”

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Bergen County Historical Society (BCHS) School of Interpretation & Volunteer Meeting : The Steenrapie (River Edge) Encampment of 1780

photo courtesy of BCHS
the staff of the Ridgewood blog

New Bridge landing NJ, As one of the major events of Bergen’s Revolutionary War history, the Steenrapie Encampment brought the American army to present day River Edge and Oradell, and forever tied Washington himself to New Bridge Landing. Join author, military historian, and BCHS Past President Todd Braisted for his presentation on the history, legends, and luminaries that became part of Bergen County in September 1780.

For anyone interested in volunteering at Historic New Bridge Landing events as a docent, greeter, operations personnel, or living-history interpreter in period dress, the Bergen County Historical Society sponsors the School of Interpretation to hone communication skills, familiarize volunteers with Bergen’s unique history, give insight into the material culture of the past, and train volunteers in historical presentation. It also provides an opportunity for prospective participants to ask questions and learn about volunteering with BCHS. Please meet in the Steuben House (the house nearest the bridge), 1209 Main St, River Edge, NJ. No charge.

Bergen County Historical Society (BCHS) School of Interpretation & Volunteer Meeting
Wednesday, January 16, 2019, 7:30 p.m.
Topic: The Steenrapie (River Edge) Encampment of 1780

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Christmas traditions are truly American, taken from different cultures and blended together

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

New Bridge Landing NJ, according to the Bergen County Historical Society , “When we look at Christmas traditions we know today, they are truly American, taken from different cultures and blended together for the celebration that we know of today. Sinterklaas comes to us from the Netherlands, leaving gifts in the shoes of good children on Saint Nicholas Day. We can see how this became Santa Claus and the tradition of gift giving. It was Washington Irving who would take the different stories of how people celebrated this time of year and set the foundation we know today. You also can’t have a cookie exchange if it wasn’t for the Dutch. The word is Dutch in origin was originally spelled koekje. Many other regions and groups have contributed to the celebration and you may celebrate your own way with traditions or not at all. Either way, the NY/NJ contributed greatly to the traditions we know today.”

The Bergen County Historical Society (BCHS), a 501(c)(3) non-profit volunteer organization founded in 1902, promotes preservation, study and appreciation of local history.

The Bergen County Historical Society was instrumental in saving the historic Steuben House in River Edge in 1928. The Society established its museum headquarters there in September 1939 and promoted the establishment of the Historic New Bridge Landing Park Commission by legislation in 1995. The purpose of the Commission is to unify and coordinate governmental and private efforts not only to preserve the three Bergen Dutch sandstone houses and their unique cultural contents, presently standing on the Revolutionary War battleground at New Bridge, but also to develop the necessary visitor facilities and amenities commensurate with the significance of the site, its importance to Bergen County and the promotion of public enjoyment and appreciation for the lessons of history.

http://www.bergencountyhistory.org

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Christmas Day – Experience the annual tradition of General Washington & hundreds of soldiers crossing the Delaware River


the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Washington’s Crossing NJ, New Jersey Historic Preservation Office Christmas Day – Experience the annual tradition of General Washington & hundreds of soldiers crossing the Delaware River, reenacting the Battle of Trenton in 1776. Event sponsored by Washington Crossing Historic Park in Pennsylvania.

The crossing begins at 1pm; best to arrive around noon on either side of the river. Admission is Free!

Hope you can join us! All the details here: www.facebook.com/events/1722468697882583

Photo credit: Kim McCarty, Washington Crossing Historic Park, Pennsylvania
#njshpo #washingtoncrossing #christmasday #crossingthedelaware

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Bergen County Historical Society : While it has been nearly a month since Washington and his army left Bergen County, with Crown forces in hot pursuit

photo and post from the Bergen County Historical Society

River Edge NJ, from the Bergen County Historical Society ,While it has been nearly a month since Washington and his army left Bergen County, with Crown forces in hot pursuit, war continues to be brought to Bergen County and New Bridge..

To George Washington from Major General William Heath, 15 December 1776
From Major General William Heath

Hackensack [N.J.] Decr 15th 1776

Dear General

On the 12th Instant I reached Tapan, and Yesterday made a Forced march to this Place, with so much Secrecy and Dispatch that the Inhabitants had no Knowledge of my Coming, The Enemy had left the Town Some Days Since Except five whom we took, Two of them sick, we have taken about 50 of the Disaffected, and about 50 or 60 Muskets the greater part of which had been taken from the Whigs as is Supposed and Stored—at the Dock we found One Sloop Loaded with Hay, House Furniture, Some Spirits &c. which we have this Day unloaded, A Brig Loaded Run Down the River about 7 miles and got a Ground, I am afraid that we shall not be able to Secure the Effects[.] a Schooner loaded with Hay, Furniture &c. which had Sailed from the Dock ran on the Bank of the River the wind being very Fresh, and in the night over Set by which the Goods were Damaged if not lost—Two or three Companies have been raising Here and in the vicinity, and Field officers appointed, one Buskark Colo., at his House we found 50 bbls of Flour a number of Hogsheds of Rum &c. and at one Browns who is Lieut. Colo. about 1000 lb. of Cheese &c., one Ten Penny is Major, they are all gone Down to York to have matters Properly Settled, get ammunition arms &c. and were to have returnd on yesterday, I Beleive we have Luckily Disconcerted them,1 Such of the Inhabitants as are Friendly receive us with Joy, but are almost afraid to Speak their Sentiments, and Indeed Little or no Intelligence can be got from the Inhabitants—The Disaffected have Sent Down a Petition for Troops to protect them, and Expect them every moment (as they say) and by Some reports from New york Several regiments are in motion, and there Destination Said to be up by the north River—This report is So much Credited that I think it will be rather Hazardous to move the Troops which I have in this neighbourhood much more to the westward, as I shall thereby leave the Passage on the Back of Fort montgomery too much Exposed[.] I think therefore after having Secured every thing Here to move to Paramus, at least for a few Days as I can from that place Protect this Part of the Country, and Should they attempt the Pass in the mountains be beforehand of them.

Colo. Vose, with the Three Regiments from Ticonderoga have marched to the Neighbourhood of Chatham, where they will arrive I suppose this night or to morrow, I shall move in Such manner as best to Protect the Country and Harrass the Enemy—your Excellency is Sensible That General Wadsworth Brigade goes Home in a few Days, and I cannot learn that any militia are Coming from Connecticut—I should be glad to Know if your Excellency has wrote to the State of Massachusetts Bay for any number of their militia and whether they are Expected, I regret the loss of the Brave General Lee; and much more the manner in which He was Taken.

If the Enemy Should not be able to pass the Delaware, I think they will take a Turn this way—Several Thousands Landed at Elizabeth Town on Yesterday or the Day before, and General How has lately Gone after the army to your Quarter. I have the Honor to be with great respect your Excellencys most Humble Servt

W. Heath