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Valley Hospital Van Dien Campus and Affordable Housing

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, Part of that affordable housing plan involves an alternative approach to The Valley Hospital campus on Van Dien Avenue. Valley is moving its main hospital to a 372-bed facility on Route 17, expected to be completed by 2023. Its Ridgewood campus will then become a medical services hub. 

“It is our intent to maintain a vibrant campus that will include a walk-in care center and a range of outpatient services,” Megan Fraser, vice president of marketing and public relations for The Valley Hospital, said in an email.

I suspect everything that The Valley has at 1200 East Ridgewood Avenue will move to Van Dien after all is said and done.  The property at 1200 East Ridgewood would then go up for sale – High density housing with an affordable housing component is my bet for that location, just like their property on North Maple where the old Ford dealer was.

Also, I question whether the YMCA really needs to be physically located in Ridgewood any longer.  I would not be surprised if their property goes on the chopping block and gets sold to a developer who wants to build high density housing.  Properties within walking distance to the train station are, and will continue to be, in very high demand for luxury apartments, especially when Midtown Direct Service begins on the NJ Transit Bergen & Main Lines. 

I suspect that the YMCA might build a state of the art facility in the industrial section of Glen Rock – Harristown Road or maybe Fair Lawn – Pollitt Drive.

The Upper Ridgewood Tennis Club property will also be in play within the next few years.

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New Jersey Affordable Housing – Time to Make it Fair!

New Jersey is….

1st in the nation for highest property taxes
3rd most expensive state to live in
5th in the nation for highest per student school spending
5th in the nation for highest state income tax
6th most expensive state to purchase a home
#1 most densely populated state in the nation with 1,216 people per square mile


Land is at a premium and developers want to cash in and develop every last inch

FACT: Renting or owning a home should be affordable to NJ residents who qualify, but not at the expense of local ordinance that is contrary to NJ municipal land use law.
FACT: NJ’s affordable housing (AH) mandates are not working and our government is not listening to the voice of the people – who support AH but want it to be implemented fairly, honestly and sensibly.
FACT: The current pace of proposed AH development is not reasonable or sustainable and will be catastrophic to towns, schools, volunteer emergency services, infrastructure and to NJ’s natural resources, ecosystems, waterways and environment.


What We Want
1) We believe municipal AH obligations should not be determined by the courts and that there should be clear, statewide guidelines to follow.
2) “Builder’s remedy” lawsuits should be eliminated as a mechanism used to satisfy a municipality’s AH obligations.
3) We believe the laws governing AH must consider the impact on our schools, roads, traffic and congestion, emergency services and the preservation of open space and our quality of life.
4) NJ’s environment must be protected from sprawl and overdevelopment; AH should not be built on environmentally-sensitive land or land that has been remediated from contamination.
5) AH that is built should not “expire” and should count towards all future AH rounds and obligations.
6) We, the residents of NJ, seek to disband the Fair Share Housing Center (FSHC) who takes our hard-earned tax dollars to enrich the wallets of lawyers and developers at the expense of NJ’s future.
7) We, the people, demand a bi-partisan review of AH and legislative reform to make NJ’s affordable housing fair.


We are calling for reasonable ways to address the current problems to enact clear legislative guidelines that will: 1) ensure that AH benefits those in need; 2) implement a regional or statewide approach; 3) expand the ways in which municipalities can address their fair share of affordable housing—FAIRLY!

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Village Negotiates A Realistic Affordable Housing Plan

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, the Village of Ridgewood has negotiated a pending settlement that outlines what the village’s obligation is, in terms of units of Affordable Housing of 55 instead of 838 ,  all to have been located in the Central Business District.

Wanting immunity from potential developers’ lawsuits, the village is proposing to increase the density of some zones and to create a redevelopment plan for The Valley Hospital site.

Instead of the courts forcing 838 units on the Village of Ridgewood , the Village will adopt a new amended zoning with redevelopment in mind, creating affordable housing opportunities.

This means that increasing the permitted density in the B1 and B2 downtown districts by six to 18 units per acre and North Maple/Goffle Avenue B2 districts to permit 12 and 20 units per acre. In addition, an AH3 district will be created with graduated 14 to 18 units per acre density near Racetrack Road and Route 17.

There will also be a mandatory set-aside ordinance for incoming development to include 20 percent affordable units if the project obtains a use variance. All these increased densities are far lower than the high density housing the Aronsohn Administration agreed to for the Central Business District. 

Existing Affordable Housing

Ridgecrest Apartments – 12 units
Woodside Gardens – 4 units
Broadway Condominiums – 4 units

Approved development projects

KS Broad – 9 off-site affordable (provided at Enclave), 60 market-rate units
The Enclave – 6 affordable, 39 market-rate units
Ridgewood Dayton – 14 affordable, 93 total units
Two Forty/Chestnut Village – 7 affordable, 43 total units ( this is being disputed by owner )

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Reader asks , “why does Ridgewood seem to be taking it on the chin with Affordable Housing?”

Bike_Valley_theridgewoodblog

James, re housing:
Ok, cant disagree with the recommendation on who to vote for. But why does Ridgewood seem to be taking it on the chin? Why aren’t we fighting? Why isn’t our council actively supporting those representatives trying to undo this housing madness? Why does our legal representation seem so weak? Why did the council fold like a cheap suit when Village residents sued to stop the development and why did the council side with the developers over the residents? Why doesn’t the Village come up with some other proposal rather than agreeing to do a percentage of the squalid housing now being constructed?
So, it seems to me that the Council just agreed to plant hundreds if not thousands of new units throughout the Village.

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Village of Ridgewood Affordable Housing Presentation

the staff of the Ridgewood 

Ridgewood NJ, this is more state forced over development in Ridgewood , voting has consequences and the consequence of the Affordable Housing mandates is to create court ordered over development is a state with a sinking population and eroding tax base . 

The Village Seems to have worked out the lest invasive solution .

Please see the link below for the Affordable Housing Presentation by Presentation by Beth McManus, Village of Ridgewood Affordable Housing Planner. 

http://mods.ridgewoodnj.net/pdf/engineering/projects/AffordableHousing/RWDPres.pdf

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Rutgers–Camden report offers strategies for turning New Jersey’s distressed properties into community assets

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Camden NJ, Recovery from the historic numbers of distressed properties in New Jersey – especially in South Jersey, which bears the brunt of the burden – may be possible through a coordinated effort of multisector stakeholders, according to a new report from Rutgers University–Camden.

“Through such efforts, these ‘toxic liabilities’ can become community assets by repurposing them as residential properties and fulfilling a demand for affordable workforce housing,” says Darren Spielman, executive director of the Senator Walter Rand Institute for Public Affairs.

Continue reading Rutgers–Camden report offers strategies for turning New Jersey’s distressed properties into community assets

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New Jersey Looking to Buy Foreclosed Homes

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

River Vale NJ, Holly Schepisi New Jersey State Assemblywoman for District 39 ,Currently, New Jersey has a total of 391,428 vacant housing units, according to Census data, with the highest concentration in Newark. These numbers are staggering particularly as we build hundreds of thousands additional units of court imposed housing in New Jersey. Why aren’t we converting even a fraction of these homes into affordable housing rather than building on every last remaining parcel? What is wrong with this State?

Continue reading New Jersey Looking to Buy Foreclosed Homes

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Reader says Court Ordered Over development is part of the continuing efforts to punish the “rich’ suburbs and provide another method of transferring money from hard working folks to those who in many cases chose not to contribute

At the base level, this is not just about housing. This is part of the continuing efforts to punish the “rich’ suburbs and provide another method of transferring money from hard working folks to those who in many cases chose not to contribute. Take a look at why the tolls are so high on the bridges or your NJ Transit ticket so high. There are large percentages of those funds that support the city infrastructures, subways, etc. Money transfer?
There a volumes of books written about these schemes to ‘change’ the neighborhoods through exaction of money, influx of people who could not afford to live there, and try to force people to accept those who they would prefer not to. I don’t care what the politics, race, or lifestyle is of my neighbor as long as they can pay for the house, taxes, and upkeep.
Wake up folks, keep voting for liberals and watch the things you want to protect continue to eroded underneath you. Ridgewood is directly in the sights of the Governor and others. Anyone who thinks we wont have 1000+ units at the Valley site and other locations is just not fully aware of how these things work.

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Why court imposed housing when we have so many vacant housing units in New Jersey ?

August 7,2018

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, the state of New Jersey currently has a total of 391,428 vacant housing units, according to Census data, with the highest concentration in Newark.

In a recent report by the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy the report noted that abandoned properties have a devastating effect on the fiscal health of the town. They pay little in taxes and generate little revenue. By devaluing neighboring properties, they reduce property tax collections.

Additionally, the government bears substantial costs to deal with these properties. The report calls them “a massive drain on public resources, hitting hardest those cities already struggling to meet payrolls and invest in their future.”

Assemblywomen Holly Schepisi noted , “Currently, New Jersey has a total of 391,428 vacant housing units, according to Census data, with the highest concentration in Newark. These numbers are staggering particularly as we build hundreds of thousands additional units of court imposed housing in New Jersey. Why aren’t we converting even a fraction of these homes into affordable housing rather than building on every last remaining parcel?What is wrong with this State?”

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Assemblywomen Holly Schepisi : Raising Legitimate Concerns Over Court Forced Development is Not Racism

CBD high density housing

July 28,2018

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

River Vale NJ, Holly Schepisi (New Jersey State Assemblywoman for District 39 )” I will say this as clearly as possible. The current system does not work properly for anyone. Because I want the legislature to do its job and implement better policies for our communities does not make me a racist or xenophobic as stated by Kevin Walsh, the Fair Share Housing head. I am committed to focusing on providing affordability in housing for all that need it, including our seniors, our veterans, our disabled, new home owners, people who have lost their jobs or have a medical issue and the poor of all races. I do not care what race, religion, ethnicity, political affiliation you identify with. If you want to be my neighbor I will welcome you with open arms. What I do not want is to have every last piece of green space in the already most dense state paved over with 1,000 unit complexes. These units are being forced to be built by Fair Share Housing in communities with no public transportation, no jobs, no infrastructure, all volunteer fire and ambulance corps while increasing populations of small communities by 30 percent or more. Excising concerns about these real life issues is not racism. Calling it such is outrageous. “