Posted on

Section 265- 1B of the Village of Ridgewood Code it clearly states that Columbus Day is a holiday with respect to parking rates.

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, yesterday on Columbus day a resident reported that they were approached by a uniformed “officer” (unknown whether police or parking) who told them that payment for parking was necessary today, Columbus Day. however according to Section 265- 1B of the Village Code it clearly states that Columbus Day is a holiday with respect to parking rates.  That means free parking.

This of course begs the question: Were there any summonses issued for either overtime parking or failure to pay? If so, will all of these summonses be voided without the necessity for recipients to appear in court, or to visit the municipal court office? And, if payment is received for an unlawfully issued summons, will monies be returned?

Posted on

In fourteen hundred ninety-two Columbus sailed the ocean blue

Here is the complete 1492 poem:

IN 1492
In fourteen hundred ninety-two
Columbus sailed the ocean blue.

He had three ships and left from Spain;
He sailed through sunshine, wind and rain.

He sailed by night; he sailed by day;
He used the stars to find his way.

A compass also helped him know
How to find the way to go.

Ninety sailors were on board;
Some men worked while others snored.

Then the workers went to sleep;
And others watched the ocean deep.

Day after day they looked for land;
They dreamed of trees and rocks and sand.

October 12 their dream came true,
You never saw a happier crew!

“Indians! Indians!” Columbus cried;
His heart was filled with joyful pride.

But “India” the land was not;
It was the Bahamas, and it was hot.

The Arakawa natives were very nice;
They gave the sailors food and spice.

Columbus sailed on to find some gold
To bring back home, as he’d been told.

He made the trip again and again,
Trading gold to bring to Spain.

The first American? No, not quite.
But Columbus was brave, and he was bright.

Posted on

Christopher Columbus as controversial then , as he is today

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, Christopher Columbus  the famed Italian explorer who “discovered” the “New World” of the Americas on an expedition sponsored by King Ferdinand of Spain in 1492. Columbus was an explorer and adventurer , who leaves us with a mixed legacy. His life is that of a consummate promoter  and a figure at the center of the unforeseen and wholly “unintended consequence” of discovery.

Columbus is of course credited for opening up the Americas to European colonization as well as often blamed for the destruction of the native peoples of the islands he explored. Ultimately, he failed to find that what he set out for which was a new route to Asia and the riches it promised.  He was as controversial then , as he is today.

Continue reading Christopher Columbus as controversial then , as he is today

Posted on

Village of Ridgewood Offices Closed Columbus Day – October 8, 2018

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, All Village offices will be closed on October 8, 2018, in observance of Columbus Day. There will be no garbage or recycling pickup and the Recycling Center will also be closed. The Recycling Center will be open on October 6, 2018. The Police Department, on the second floor of Village Hall, will be open on this holiday. All offices will open again on October 9, 2018 at 8:30 a.m.

Posted on

Columbus Day, History and Controversy

columbus-day

Ridgewood Columbus Day Closing – Monday, October 9, 2017

Rodgewood NJ, Monday, October 9th is Columbus Day and all Village offices will be closed.  Village Sanitation and Recycling services will not take place that day and the Recycling Center will be closed.

Editors Note: Christopher Columbus was a very controversial figure in his day ,perhaps even more so than now. Many students of history suggest that Columbus would have thrived in today’s culture of “no press is bad press ”  and would have basked in all the attention.

Columbus Day

Columbus Day is a U.S. holiday that commemorates the landing of Christopher Columbus in the New World on October 12, 1492. It was unofficially celebrated in a number of cities and states as early as the 18th century but did not become a federal holiday until the 1937. For many, the holiday is a way of both honoring Columbus’ achievements and celebrating Italian-American heritage. Throughout its history, Columbus Day and the man who inspired it have generated controversy, and many alternatives to the holiday have appeared in recent years.

http://www.history.com/topics/columbus-day

Origins of Columbus Day
A U.S. national holiday since 1937, Columbus Day commemorates the arrival of Christopher Columbus in the New World on October 12, 1492. The Italian-born explorer had set sail two months earlier, backed by the Spanish monarchs King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella. He intended to chart a western sea route to China, India and the fabled gold and spice islands of Asia; instead, he landed in the Bahamas, becoming the first European to explore the Americas since the Vikings set up colonies in Greenland and Newfoundland during the 10th century.

Later that month, Columbus sighted Cuba and believed it was mainland China; in December the expedition found Hispaniola, which he though might be Japan. There, he established Spain’s first colony in the Americas with 39 of his men. In March 1493, the explorer returned to Spain in triumph, bearing gold, spices and “Indian” captives. He crossed the Atlantic several more times before his death in 1506; by his third journey, he realized that he hadn’t reached Asia but instead had stumbled upon a continent previously unknown to Europeans.

Columbus Day in the United States
The first Columbus Day celebration took place in 1792, when New York’s Columbian Order–better known as Tammany Hall–held an event to commemorate the historic landing’s 300th anniversary. Taking pride in Columbus’ birthplace and faith, Italian and Catholic communities in various parts of the country began organizing annual religious ceremonies and parades in his honor. In 1892, President Benjamin Harrison issued a proclamation encouraging Americans to mark the 400th anniversary of Columbus’ voyage with patriotic festivities, writing, “On that day let the people, so far as possible, cease from toil and devote themselves to such exercises as may best express honor to the discoverer and their appreciation of the great achievements of the four completed centuries of American life.”

In 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed Columbus Day a national holiday, largely as a result of intense lobbying by the Knights of Columbus, an influential Catholic fraternal benefits organization. Originally observed every October 12, it was fixed to the second Monday in October in 1971.

http://www.history.com/topics/columbus-day

Columbus Day Alternatives
Opposition to Columbus Day dates back to the 19th century, when anti-immigrant groups in the United States rejected the holiday because of its association with Catholicism. In recent decades, Native Americans and other groups have protested the celebration of an event that indirectly resulted in the colonization of the Americas and the death of millions: European settlers brought a host of infectious diseases, including smallpox and influenza, that decimated indigenous populations; warfare between Native Americans and the colonists claimed many lives as well. The image of Christopher Columbus as an intrepid hero has also been called into question. Upon arriving in the Bahamas, the explorer and his men forced the native peoples they found there into slavery; later, while serving as the governor of Hispaniola, he allegedly imposed barbaric forms of punishment, including torture.

In many Latin American nations, the anniversary of Columbus’ landing has traditionally been observed as the Dìa de la Raza (“Day of the Race”), a celebration of Hispanic culture’s diverse roots. In 2002, Venezuela renamed the holiday Dìa de la Resistencia Indìgena (“Day of Indigenous Resistance”) to recognize native peoples and their experience. Several U.S. cities and states have replaced Columbus Day with alternative days of remembrance; examples include Berkeley’s Indigenous Peoples Day, South Dakota’s Native American Day and Hawaii’s Discoverer’s Day, which commemorates the arrival of Polynesian settlers.

http://www.history.com/topics/columbus-day

Columbus Day Traditions
In many parts of the United States, Columbus Day has evolved into a celebration of Italian-American heritage. Local groups host parades and street fairs featuring colorful costumes, music and Italian food. In cities and towns that use the day to honor indigenous peoples, activities include pow-wows, traditional dance and lessons about Native American culture.

http://www.history.com/topics/columbus-day

Posted on

VILLAGE OFFICE CLOSED OCTOBER 10, 2016 – COLUMBUS DAY

columbus-day

October 10,2016

the staff of the Ridgewood blog
Ridgewood NJ, Village Offices will be closed on October 10, 2016 for Columbus Day, there will also be no garbage or recycling pickup on this day. Offices will reopen on October 11, 2016.

Here is the complete 1492 poem:

IN 1492

In fourteen hundred ninety-two
Columbus sailed the ocean blue.

He had three ships and left from Spain;
He sailed through sunshine, wind and rain.

He sailed by night; he sailed by day;
He used the stars to find his way.

A compass also helped him know
How to find the way to go.

Ninety sailors were on board;
Some men worked while others snored.

Then the workers went to sleep;
And others watched the ocean deep.

Day after day they looked for land;
They dreamed of trees and rocks and sand.

October 12 their dream came true,
You never saw a happier crew!

“Indians!  Indians!”  Columbus cried;
His heart was filled with joyful pride.

But “India” the land was not;
It was the Bahamas, and it was hot.

The Arakawa natives were very nice;
They gave the sailors food and spice.

Columbus sailed on to find some gold
To bring back home, as he’d been told.

He made the trip again and again,
Trading gold to bring to Spain.

The first American?  No, not quite.
But Columbus was brave, and he was bright.

 

Posted on

Ridgewood Schools No longer Closed on Columbus Day

columbus-day

May 28,2016

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, Could it be that Ridgewood Schools are NOT closed for Columbus day this year?

Columbus Day first became an official state holiday in Colorado in 1906, and became a federal holiday in the United States in 1937, though people have celebrated Columbus’s voyage since the colonial period. In 1792, New York City and other U.S. cities celebrated the 300th anniversary of his landing in the New World. President Benjamin Harrison called upon the people of the United States to celebrate Columbus Day on the 400th anniversary of the event. During the four hundredth anniversary in 1892, teachers, preachers, poets and politicians used Columbus Day rituals to teach ideals of patriotism. These patriotic rituals took themes such as citizenship boundaries, the importance of loyalty to the nation, and celebrating social progress.

Many Italian-Americans observe Columbus Day as a celebration of their heritage, the first occasion being in New York City on October 12, 1866. Columbus Day was first enshrined as a legal holiday in the United States through the lobbying of Angelo Noce, a first generation Italian, in Denver. The first statewide Columbus Day holiday was proclaimed by Colorado governor Jesse F. McDonald in 1905, and it was made a statutory holiday in 1907. In April 1934, as a result of lobbying by the Knights of Columbus and New York City Italian leader Generoso Pope, Congress and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt proclaimed October 12 a federal holiday under the name Columbus Day.

Since 1970 (Oct. 12), the holiday has been fixed to the second Monday in October, coincidentally exactly the same day as Thanksgiving in neighboring Canada fixed since 1959. It is generally observed nowadays by banks, the bond market, the U.S. Postal Service, other federal agencies, most state government offices, many businesses, and most school districts. Some businesses and some stock exchanges remain open, and some states and municipalities abstain from observing the holiday. The traditional date of the holiday also adjoins the anniversary of the United States Navy (founded October 13, 1775), and thus both occasions are customarily observed by the Navy (and usually the Marine Corps as well) with either a 72- or 96-hour liberty period.

Posted on

Christopher Columbus: American Icon?

Christopher-Columbus

Christopher Columbus: American Icon?
Julia Shaw / October 09, 2012

Columbus Day is an unusual American holiday. It doesn’t commemorate a President or a great American statesman. Christopher Columbus found North America, but he didn’t find, or found, the United States.

As Columbus Day rolled around this year, President Obama tried to subtly change the focus of the holiday. Rather than simply celebrate a daring explorer, he also wanted to spotlight the “indigenous peoples who had inhabited the Western hemisphere for millennia.” His presidential proclamation invited Americans to “reflect on the tragic burdens tribal communities bore in the years that followed [Columbus’s landing]…[and to] commemorate the many contributions they have made to the American experience, and let us continue to strengthen the ties that bind us today.”

But this misses the significance of why America celebrates Columbus Day.

Leon Kass, Amy Kass, and Diana Schuab provide a thorough overview of the history and tradition of Columbus Day in their curriculum, What So Proudly We Hail. Columbus was indeed an important figure for many immigrant communities. More than that, Christopher Columbus has long been an American icon.

“The association between Columbus and America continued to prosper as the revolutionary colonists sought to distance themselves from England,” the curriculum observes. “In Columbus, they found a hero who had challenged the unknown sea, leaving the Old World for a new beginning on a virgin continent—much as they were attempting to do.” By the late 18th century, Americans saw Columbus as “a mythic founding figure.” In the 19th century, he was seen as an “archetype of the American ideal: bold, adventurous, innovative.”

No one captures this better than Ronald Reagan. In a 1988 presidential proclamation, Reagan commemorates Columbus for his spirit: “He was a dreamer, a man of vision and courage, a man filled with hope for the future and with the determination to cast off for the unknown and sail into uncharted seas for the joy of finding whatever was there. Put it all together and you might say that Columbus was the inventor of the American dream.”

Far from a day to remember our divisions or to dwell on past wrongs, Columbus Day is a day to celebrate an American dream that values diversity, yes, but also rewards daring risk-takers. Or as Reagan put it, “not only an intrepid searcher but the dreams and opportunities that brought so many here after him.”

http://dailysignal.com/2012/10/09/christopher-columbus-american-icon/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social