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Reader says , “owners are responsible for the actions of their dogs”

photo by ArtChick

I find it amusing and perhaps indicative of where our society is today that there is no mention of the dog owners in this article. All of the responsibility has been laid on the person who is bitten and/or the dogs natural instinct.

Even dog owners know…… There are good dog owners and bad dog owners.
Dogs are animals, the owners are responsible for the actions of their dogs

How about a list starting with:
Train your dog
Leash your dog
Hold on to the leash
Keep the leash at a reasonable length
Maintain control over your dog at all times – make sure they know who their master is.
Don’t assume everyone wants your dog to jump all over them and/or their children
Do not encourage strangers to pet your dog

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Dog Bite Statistics (How Likely Are You To Get Bit?)

wolfman

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, The Ridgewood Health Department offers these guidelines for staying safe around dogs. According to a study from the Center for Disease Control (CDC), approximately 4.7 million dog bites occur in the United States each year, and 800,000 of those bites result in medical care.
These are scary statistics. But scary becomes a lot less so when you’re armed with the right information. From accounting for your own behavior around animals, to why dogs actually bite in the first place, we’re giving you an arsenal of information in this article so you can bite back in the dog bite debate.

Why does a dog bite?
• Dogs bite as a reaction to a stressful situation.
• They may be scared or threatened.
• To protect themselves, their puppies, or their owners.
• They’re not feeling well or if they’re startled.
• They may nip or bite during play (which is why rough play should be avoided to ensure you don’t overly excite your animal).

Keep these triggers in mind anytime you’re around a canine. Your awareness of their mental state will help you recognize a potential bite situation more quickly.

While we’re not absolving the canine completely of its own responsibility in a dog-bite situation, there are always two sides to a story — even a bad one. When it comes to your side, there are more than two things that you can do to decrease your chances of an attack.

Just like people, there are always good pets that snap. Even though the dog never displayed any aggressive attitudes, even though you didn’t provoke him to attack, there are still those unaccountable instances that no one can explain or rationalize. However, more often than not, this isn’t the case.

That’s why, when dealing with any dog, you should maintain confident, but cautious body-language. Below are a few things you can do to make sure your attitude doesn’t trigger an attack.
• Don’t approach an unfamiliar animal.
• Do not run from a dog, panic or make loud noises.
• If an unfamiliar dog approaches you, remain motionless. Do not run or scream. Avoid direct eye contact.
• Don’t disturb a dog while they’re eating, sleeping, or taking care of their puppies.
• Allow a dog to sniff and smell you before you attempt to pet it. Afterward scratch the animal under the chin, not on the head.
• Report strays or dogs displaying strange behavior to your local animal control.
• If knocked over by a dog, roll into a ball and remain motionless. Be sure to cover your ears and neck with your hands and arms. Avoid eye contact and remain calm.
• Don’t encourage your dog to play aggressively.
• In some situations when a dog is approaching you just giving the command “no” or “bad dog” will make the dog back off.

If you are bitten by a dog you must get the information of the owner to see if the dog is current on vaccinations. You must also report the bite to the local Health Department and/or Police Department to investigate. It is also recommended that you see a physician to prevent any infections. Dog bites can get infected.

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Do 60% of American Pet Owners Have Pet-Separation Anxiety?

cat in bag

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Surveying 1,000 Americans, the data researchers at Ooma https://www.ooma.com/home-security/butterfleye-security-camera/] — a Silicon Valley company offering an innovative home security and monitoring platform and makers of the Ooma Butterfleye smart security camera — discovered that some people love their pets so much, they go to great lengths to spend every moment with them — even when they aren’t home.

Continue reading Do 60% of American Pet Owners Have Pet-Separation Anxiety?

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Blessing of the Animals at Christ Episcopal Church, Ridgewood

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, On Saturday, September 29th, 2018 at 10:00 AM, there will be a Blessing of the Animals celebrating the Feast of St. Francis at Christ Episcopal Church, 105 Cottage Place in Ridgewood. Everyone is invited to bring their favorite pets: dogs, cats, rabbits, goldfish, stuffed animals . . .any beloved “creatures, great or small. A short service celebrating all animals will be followed by individual blessings of each animal. Some orphaned dogs and cats who are eligible for adoption from the Ramapo-Bergen Animal Refuge in Oakland will also be present. Refreshments will be served. The service will be held inside the church, rain or shine.

Continue reading Blessing of the Animals at Christ Episcopal Church, Ridgewood

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Dog Walkers Not Removing Dog Waste in Ridgewood

Vicious_dog_theridgewoodblog

June 11.2018

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, the Ridgewood blog picked this up off a Facebook group “it takes a Ridgewood Village” ,the author Anne LaGrange Loving gives the latest on her dog walking experience ,  “So here is a new one (to me). I was walking my elderly dog very early this morning and up ahead I saw a woman walking a dog. He pooped, she stopped to bag it, and then she left the bag full of poop there on the grass. What? I could not believe it. I continued walking, but she was getting further ahead because my old dog is pretty slow and we cannot cover much ground at all. But lo and behold, several houses later I saw the same thing happen, bag of poop left behind again. Besides being extraordinarily rude (and I believe against local law), it struck me as really weird that she would bother to bag it if she was not going to take it. Shaking my head.”

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Ridgewood Veterinary Hospital is open from 8-5:00 on Saturday and Sunday, and closed on Monday

Ridgewood Veterinary Hospital , 12th Adopt-A-Pet Day!

may 27,2018

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, Ridgewood Veterinary Hospital is open from 8-5:00 on Saturday and Sunday, and closed on Monday. If you have an emergency please call our office at 201-447-6000. We will re-open for regular business hours on Tuesday. Have a memorable weekend and summer!

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Midland Park Police : Pooper Scooper Alert

Vicious_dog_theridgewoodblog

February 3,2018

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Midland Park  NJ, the Midland Park Police Department have had several incidents of an unknown person walking their dog in front of the Godwin School and not picking up their dogs fecal matter. If you see someone walking their dog near the Godwin School and they do not remove the dogs fecal matter please call the Midland Park Police Department at 201-444-2300. Thank you!

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Ridgewood Veterinary Hospital : Canine Influenza Sweeps the Nation

Sick Dog

February 1,2018

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, the Ridgewood Veterinary Hospital says that while the flu virus that is currently affecting people is not related to the Canine Influenza Virus (CIV), it’s a good time to remember your faithful friend while it is fresh in your mind.

It is now easier than ever to protect your dog since a new vaccine helps prevent BOTH strains of Canine Influenza Virus (H3N2 and H3N8). We are offering discounted clinics from now through the end of February 2018 to help keep all dogs current with the CIV vaccine. Call to schedule an appointment, because our clinics are filling up fast 201-447-6000. Click on the link to see the segment about canine influenza on Good Morning America:

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Ridgewood Dog Lovers Can’t Wait for the Woof Gang Bakery Grand Opening

wolfgang

January 13,2017

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridewood NJ, on January 20th the Woof Gang Bakery will host its Grand Opening in Ridgewood . The Woof Gang Bakery is a leading specialty retailer of pet food, pet-related supplies and pet grooming, with more than 80 locations across the U.S. The Ridgewood store will be located at 234 E. Ridgewood Ave., Ridgewood, NJ 07450

Woof Gang Bakery offers the very best in pet care by providing quality products at competitive prices and knowledgeable, caring customer service. Each Woof Gang Bakery location is a convenient, neighborhood store with connections to the local community. The company is committed to the well-being, health and happiness of pets.

In 2016, Woof Gang Bakery received the Retailer of the Year Franchise Award from Pet Product News, the Multi-Service Excellence Award from Pet Business Media and was ranked among the nation’s top retailers by Pet Business magazine. Recently, the company also was named best overall multi-unit retailer by Pet Business Media and recognized by Pet Insight magazine as one of the nation’s fastest growing pet chains.

At Woof Gang Bakery, we know that pets are a part of our families, our faithful companions and they bring us great joy. We’ll help you show your love and appreciation for their unconditional affection and devotion.

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Reader claims residents WANT THEIR DOGS to SCARE and perhaps BITE people

Vicious_dog_theridgewoodblog

file photo by William Thomas

Hey, its happened to me too. I walk on sidewalk on Meadwobrook and people’s dogs on leash lung toward me and the owners don’ t care People are getting out their anger with their dogs. Likeing it when their dogs try to attack walkers.
I wrote about this problem last year on this blog as a comment to a posting
Apparently, according a someone who responded to my comment, you can buy mace or something from a sporting goods store for protection. I haven’t done it yet, but it is coming to that.
A trained dog will not lunge at walkers. I know because I walk a family members dog regularly here in town, again along Meadowbrook. It is very easy to train a dog not to lunge at people. I also grew up with a dog.
Also , just last week , a few days ago, I walked Dunham Trail by myself, never did it before, but since it was Octoberwalkfest , or something, I did it. A woman came from the opposite direction from the Grove entrance with TWO UNLEASHED DOGS. The dogs ran toward me and stopped dead in their tracks , daring me to advance. on the path. I was terrifiedand got off the path. The woman continued to walk her dogs, she did not call them back or apologize. I told her she isnt supposed to walk dogs unleashed in the park , She ignored me. I am an elderly woman, old, look old, walk old, you get it.
Also I walked Pleasant Park for the first time this past Saturday. A man with a huge dog was walking it on a leash. I got out of the way, climbing over piles of brush and fallen logs.
Hey, I love dogs. I grew up with one, a collie dog that looked like Lassie, my love and joy throughout my childhood. But people do not train their dogs not to attack people. And it’s done on purpose.
This is not really a nice community. Keep braggin folks.
The residents WANT THEIR DOGS to SCARE and perhaps BITE people.