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Five Car Pile Up in Paramus Results in Multiple Injuries

Paramus 5 car crash

photos courtesy of Boyd Loving’s Facebook page

February 9,2018

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Paramus NJ, A five (5) vehicle, Thursday morning, 02/08, crash on Route 17 southbound near West Century Road in Paramus resulted in multiple injuries and snarled traffic on Route 17 in both directions. Paramus Police responded along with Paramus EMS and mutual aid ambulances from The Valley Hospital and Holy Name Medical Center. All five (5) vehicles involved in the collision required tow trucks to remove them from the highway.

 

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Rollover Collision in New Milford at Intersection of Boulevard and Henley Avenue

Rollover Collision in New Milford at Intersection of Boulevard and Henley Avenue

photo courtesy of Boyd Loving’s Facebook page

January 19,2017

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

New Milford NJ, A Toyota 4 Runner rolled over on its side following a collision at the intersection of Boulevard and Henley Avenue in New Milford on Wednesday afternoon, 01/18. The 4 Runner’s female driver was successfully extricated from the vehicle (through a sunroof) by New Milford FD personnel, The other vehicle involved in the collision, a Toyota Camry sedan, sustained heavy front end damage. Both vehicles were removed from the scene by flatbed tow trucks. No information was available as to the nature of injuries sustained, if any, by either vehicles’ occupants. New Milford PD & FD responded, along with a BLS ambulance from Holy Name Medical Center. A MONOC Emergency Physician’s vehicle was also observed at the incident.

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Lung Patients Receive Harmonica Therapy at New Jersey Hospital

Harmonica Therapy

‘Harmonicare’ may strengthen diaphragm muscles and improve stamina

By
KATE KING
Jan. 2, 2017 2:15 p.m. ET

TEANECK, N. J.—The group gathered around a conference table at Holy Name Medical Center and flipped through binders until they found the music for Chloe Fernandez’s favorite song. Taking deep breaths, they raised their harmonicas to their lips and blew the first notes of Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy.”

Chloe, 9 years old, of Ridgewood, N.J., is one of the youngest participants in the hospital’s “Harmonicare” weekly classes. The year-old program provides free harmonica instruction to people suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, and other lung ailments.

“We don’t judge when somebody messes up,” said Chloe. “It’s supportive.”

http://www.wsj.com/articles/lung-patients-receive-harmonica-therapy-at-new-jersey-hospital-1483384519

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Now Englewood Steps Up with Teaneck to challenge their local hospitals’ exemption from property taxes

valley_hospital_theridgewoodblog

BY MARY DIDUCH AND LINDY WASHBURN
STAFF WRITERS |
THE RECORD

Both Teaneck and Englewood are challenging the tax-exempt status of their local hospitals, joining a growing list of municipalities who want non-profit hospitals to pay property taxes.

The councils of the two municipalities voted to file tax appeals against Englewood Hospital and Medical Center and Holy Name Medical Center in Teaneck. Of 62 non-profit hospitals in the state, 17 others now face similar lawsuits.

http://www.northjersey.com/news/englewood-teaneck-to-challenge-their-local-hospitals-exemption-from-property-taxes-1.1532070

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Teaneck to legally challenge Holy Name Medical Center’s exemption from local property taxes

valley_hospital_theridgewoodblog

BY MARY DIDUCH AND LINDY WASHBURN
STAFF WRITERS |
THE RECORD

Teaneck’s township council voted Tuesday to file suit against Holy Name Medical Center’s exemption from local property taxes, as municipal governments around the state take aim at non-profit hospitals for potential tax revenues.

The council voted, 5-1, to authorize the action after two Holy Name executives spoke against the resolution.

“We can avoid all those legal expenses,” said Ryan Kennedy, the hospital’s chief financial officer, appealing to the council to work with the hospital to find a solution.

“It’s a silly route to go,” Michael Maron, the hospital’s president and CEO, said before the meeting. “We’ve had a reasonable relationship over the course of time. We should sit down and talk.” Once a tax appeal is filed, both sides have to hire lawyers and litigation takes years.

The town should wait and negotiate with the hospital, he said. “Worst case scenario, another year goes by,” he said. “Is that the end of the world?”

“We support the town, and we’re willing to consider supporting the town even more,” he said.

Emboldened by a recent state tax court decision, the council took action to “preserve its rights” to potential tax revenues as an Apr. 1 deadline for 2016 tax appeals looms.

Under the current tax rate, if Holy Name’s entire 20-acre property were to be taxed, the liability would be about $2 million. But Maron said the hospital already pays taxes on various smaller properties it owns. It provides free flu vaccines to borough employees, supplies to the ambulance corps, and funds to support special township initiatives, he said.

http://www.northjersey.com/news/teaneck-to-legally-challenge-holy-name-medical-center-s-exemption-from-local-property-taxes-1.1531590

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Northern New Jersey Hospitals Collaborate to Defeat Healthcare-Acquired Infections

valley_hospital_theridgewoodblog

March 8th 2016

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ,  The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, NJ, and Holy Name Medical Center in Teaneck, NJ, are collaborating to defeat a common foe: a dangerous drug-resistant bacterium called Clostridium difficile, or C. difficile.

The two hospitals recently announced the formation of the Valley-Holy Name Joint Healthcare-Acquired Infections/Antibiotic Resistance Collaborative.

C. difficile is a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon. It was responsible for almost half a million infections and was associated with approximately 29,000 deaths in 2011, according to a study released last year by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

“C. difficile is public enemy No. 1 and it is clear that defeating it will take a cooperative, multi-institutional and multidisciplinary approach, since the infection can be picked up at any point in a patient’s care and can be transmitted from institution to institution, “said Neil Gaffin, M.D., an infectious disease specialist at The Valley Hospital, “No one is going to get anywhere without working together.”

The CDC study found that 65.8 percent of the cases of C. difficile were health care–associated, but only 24.2 percent had onset during hospitalization. The rest originated in a nursing home or were associated with having received outpatient care at a health care facility. The CDC has called upon health care facilities to work together to fight C. difficile, noting that because these infections can be spread inside of and between health care facilities when patients are transferred from one facility to another, a lack of coordination can put patients at risk.

Healthcare organizations are working very hard to meet the challenge of this organism, which is resistant to antibiotics causing overgrowth in the intestine in patients who are receiving antibiotic and produces a spore which persists in the environment, unaffected by soap and water as well as alcohol-based sanitizers. In addition, this organism produces a toxin which causes disease.

“We are employing bleach–based disinfectants, which are the only compounds that will inactivate the spores, and are restricting the use, spectrum and duration of antibiotic therapy to preserve the normal organisms in a patient,” said Thomas Birch, M.D., an infectious disease specialist at Holy Name Medical Center.

Valley has also instituted an aggressive campaign to reduce the unnecessary use of antibiotics and a comprehensive environmental disinfection program.

The Valley Hospital and Holy Name Medical Center are following the CDC’s recommendation and taking a collaborative approach to the problem. Representative of both hospitals are meeting regularly to share best practices — including restricting the use of antibiotics, infection control practices and procedures, and diagnosis and treatment protocols — and are working with area nursing homes in an effort to limit the spread of C. difficile throughout the healthcare continuum.

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The Valley Hospital, Holy Name Medical Center win right to see report on tiered insurance plan

valley_hospital_theridgewoodblog

BY LINDY WASHBURN
STAFF WRITER |
THE RECORD

Sixteen months before the state’s largest insurer launched new health plans that steer patients to its preferred hospitals, called Tier 1, a report from its consultants spelled out how the Omnia health plan would work and what it would do to the state’s health care business.

 

http://www.northjersey.com/news/health-news/excluded-hospitals-win-right-to-tier-report-1.1522657

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N.J.’s largest insurer sues Holy Name Medical Center, Valley Hospital over ads

valley_hospital_theridgewoodblog

JANUARY 29, 2016, 4:20 PM    LAST UPDATED: FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2016, 5:10 PM
BY MARY JO LAYTON
STAFF WRITER |
THE RECORD

The state’s largest insurer has sued Holy Name Medical Center in Teaneck and The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood to halt an ad campaign the hospitals launched in protest of a new tiered health plan they say makes them look inferior.

Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey calls the advertising against its Omnia plan a “smear campaign” — one that goes so far as to say the insurer doesn’t like babies. The campaign is motivated “solely by a desire to damage Horizon financially as well as its business reputation,” the lawsuit filed this week noted.

Bruce Rosen, an attorney representing Valley and Holy Name, defended the ads on Friday. “This is a blatant attempt by Horizon to distract attention away from the potentially disastrous impact that the Omnia plan is going to have on the two hospitals, their patients and New Jersey’s health care system,” he said.

http://www.northjersey.com/news/n-j-s-largest-insurer-sues-holy-name-medical-center-valley-hospital-over-ads-1.1502250

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Holy Name Medical Center, Valley Hospital sue to block ads for new tiered Horizon insurance plan

valley_hospital_theridgewoodblog

DECEMBER 10, 2015, 3:15 PM    LAST UPDATED: THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2015, 3:20 PM
BY LINDY WASHBURN
STAFF WRITER |
THE RECORD

Holy Name Medical Center in Teaneck and The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood opened a new front in the widening fight against the state’s largest insurer Thursday, with a lawsuit demanding that Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey halt further advertising of a new, tiered health plan because — by leaving their hospitals out of the preferred tier — it makes them look inferior.

Horizon breached its contract with the hospitals when it announced the new Omnia health plans in September, the lawsuit filed in state Superior Court in Hackensack by the two hospitals and five others said. The insurer was obligated to give the hospitals an opportunity to negotiate participation in the new plans, the suit said.

The Omnia plans, now being advertised widely, group hospitals into two tiers, and will allow patients to pay lower deductibles and co-insurance when they seek care from a preferred, or Tier 1, hospital. The plans are being sold to individuals, small businesses, state government employees and people who buy insurance through the federal Affordable Care Act for coverage starting Jan. 1. Premiums are 12 to 15 percent lower than for other Horizon plans.

“They’re using marketing that is misleading,” said Michael Furey, an attorney with Day Pitney who represents the seven hospital systems suing Horizon, saying that this damages the reputation of his clients. They’re “making the consumer think that somehow the Tier 1 hospitals are superior and the Tier 2 hospitals are inferior,” he said.

Horizon is the largest provider of health insurance in New Jersey, with more than 50 percent of the commercial market. In total, including Medicare, Medicaid, state and federal employee coverage, it provides insurance to 3.8 million people in the state.

In Bergen and Passaic counties, the Tier 1 network includes St. Joseph’s Healthcare System, with hospitals in Wayne and Paterson, and Hackensack University Medical Center and its affiliated hospitals — HackensackUMC at Pascack Valley in Westwood and Englewood Hospital and Medical Center.

Holy Name, Valley, and St. Mary’s General Hospital in Passaic are in Tier 2.

http://www.northjersey.com/news/holy-name-medical-center-valley-hospital-sue-to-block-ads-for-new-tiered-horizon-insurance-plan-1.1471869