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LITTLE FERRY MOM CHARGED WITH MURDER OF BABY

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Little Ferry NJ, Acting Bergen County Prosecutor Dennis Calo announced the arrest of HIRALBAHEN BHAVSAR (DOB: 8/20/1989; married; and un-employed) of 310 Liberty Road, Apartment # 35, Little Ferry, N.J. on a charge of Murder and Possession of a Weapon for Unlawful Purpose. The arrest is the result of an investigation conducted by the Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office under the direction of Chief Robert Anzilotti, the Little Ferry Police Department under the direction of Chief Ralph Verdi, and the Bergen County Sheriff’s Office under the direction of Sheriff Anthony Cureton.

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BERGEN PROSECUTOR INVESTIGATES MURDER OF SOUTH HACKENSACK MAN

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

South Hackensack NJ, Acting Bergen County Prosecutor Dennis Calo announced the investigation into the death of Ismael Fajardo (an 18-year-old male) of 12 Hoffman Street, South Hackensack, N.J. The investigation is being conducted by the Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office Major Crimes Unit under the direction of Chief Robert Anzilotti, the Bergen County Sheriff’s Office under the direction of Sheriff Anthony Cureton, and the South Hackensack Police Department under the direction of Chief Joseph Terraccino.

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ENGLEWOOD MAN CHARGED WITH TWO COUNTS OF MURDER

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Englewood NJ, Acting Bergen County Prosecutor Dennis Calo announced the arrest of Pawel M. Boduch (DOB: 06/30/1975; single; unemployed) of 113 Lafayette Place, Englewood, N.J. on charges of Murder and Possession of a Weapon for an Unlawful Purpose. The arrest is the result of an investigation conducted by the Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office under the direction of Chief Robert Anzilotti, the Bergen County Sheriff’s Office under the direction of Sheriff Anthony Cureton, and the Englewood Police Department under the direction of Chief Lawrence Suffern.

On Saturday, February 16, 2019, the Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office received information that two individuals were found deceased inside a Lafayette Place home. The decedents were subsequently identified as the home’s residents; Edward Boduch, 71 years old, and his wife, Miroslawa Potocka, 72 years old. Both were victims of homicide and each suffered multiple apparent stab wounds. The third occupant of the residence, their son Pawel M. Boduch, was not home at the time police discovered the bodies.

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What Drives Our Never-Ending Fascination With Real-Life Murder Stories?

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Death Of Media Icon Dorothy Kilgallen Latest Case Drawing Renewed Interest

January 23,2017

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood Nj, America loves a good murder mystery, as evidenced by endless TV dramas, movies such as The Girl on the Train, and novels by writers such as Patricia Cornwell and Michael Connelly.

But the infatuation isn’t limited to fiction. The public is also riveted by every detail of real-life homicides, whether it’s the O.J. Simpson trial, the murder of 6-year-old JonBenet Ramsey, or the extraordinary phenomenon of the TV documentary Making a Murderer.

“People can’t help but be captivated with the human drama when another person’s life ends in violence,” says attorney and investigative reporter Mark Shaw, author of The Reporter Who Knew Too Much (www.thereporterwhoknewtoomuch.com).

Shaw’s own fascination these days is focused on the mysterious death of Dorothy Kilgallen, the Pulitzer-Prize nominated newspaper columnist and panelist on the popular TV show What’s My Line. She was a household name in 1965 when she was discovered dead in her home at age 52.

“With Dorothy, I think you have all the compelling elements,” says Shaw, who served as a legal analyst for USA Today and CNN during the O.J. Simpson trial. “We have a famous journalist killed in the line of duty for writing a ‘tell-all’ book and there are celebrity suspects galore who were never investigated.”

Officially, Kilgallen’s death was ruled accidental, caused by a fatal mixture of sleeping pills and alcohol. Shaw says his research uncovered new evidence that points to murder (posted at www.thedorothykilgallenstory.org.) The motive: Her book that would have exposed a mobster’s involvement in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Shaw has called on the NYC District Attorney to investigate since “murder is the worst form of censorship” and a main suspect remains at large.

Kilgallen’s own journalistic career serves as evidence that fascination with true-crime stories is nothing new. She wrote about seemingly every “trial of the century” of her era, including the Lindbergh baby kidnapping, the Dr. Sam Sheppard case that gripped Americans and inspired the TV series The Fugitive, and the trial of Jack Ruby, who killed Lee Harvey Oswald, the man accused of assassinating Kennedy.

Why are we so enthralled by these cases? Shaw says there are several reasons:

• A belief in justice. Most people want to see justice served, whether they suspect a guilty culprit got away with murder or worry that an innocent person was wrongly accused. “In fiction, everything usually gets wrapped up very tidily,” Shaw says. “In real life, justice can be a whole lot messier.”
• A natural attraction to mystery. People are captivated by the unknown, whether it’s the “whodunit” at the end of an Agatha Christie novel, the contents of the large package under the Christmas tree, or the very meaning of human existence. “This is probably one reason there’s still so much interest in the JFK assassination,” Shaw says. “There are elements of mystery all around it and we can’t help but want to get at the truth.”
• A preoccupation with death. As gruesome as it seems, people have been drawn to stories about violent death for thousands of years. Even the Bible wastes little time working in a murder, with Cain offing his brother Abel in a fit of jealousy in one of the earliest chapters.
“One other reason may be that we have empathy for the victim and feel they deserve their ‘day in court,’ so to speak,” Shaw says. “And that’s true whether the murder happened five days ago or 50 years ago as it did with Kilgallen. She deserves justice today and I’m determined to get that for her at all costs.”

About Mark Shaw

Mark Shaw, author of The Reporter Who Knew Too Much(www.markshawbooks.com), is a former criminal defense attorney and legal analyst for CNN, ESPN and USA Today.  He is an investigative reporter and the author of 25 books including The Poison Patriarch, Miscarriage of Justice, and Beneath the Mask of Holiness. Shaw, a member of the American Society of Journalists and Authors, has written for USA Today, Huffington Post, and the Aspen Daily News.

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Bill Barring School Board Candidates With Criminal Convictions Advances

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By JT Aregood • 12/12/16 12:18pm

Assemblyman Rob Karabinchak, who sponsored the bill along with Assembly Speaker Vince Prieto. New Jersey Legislature

Hopefuls with criminal convictions could soon be barred from running for local New Jersey school boards. A legislative committee advanced a bill to force would-be school board candidates to submit an affirmation to the state that he or she has not been convicted of any first or second-degree crime on Monday.

Those disqualifying convictions would include endangering the welfare of a child; drug possession or distribution; robbery, burglary, aggravated assault, stalking, kidnapping, arson, manslaughter and murder; terroristic threats; criminal restraint; perjury, and bias intimidation.

Assembly sponsor Robert Karabinchak said in a statement after the committee vote that he believes the new requirement would help protect students in the state.

http://observer.com/2016/12/assembly-bill-barring-school-board-candidates-with-criminal-convictions-advances/?utm_campaign=Observer_NJ_Politics&utm_content=New%20Campaign&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=New%20Jersey%20Politics

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America’s Number One Prescription Sleep Aid Could Trigger ‘Zombies,’ Murder and Other Disturbing Behavior

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America’s Number One Prescription Sleep Aid Could Trigger ‘Zombies,’ Murder and Other Disturbing Behavior

Ambien is becoming better known for triggering bizarre behavior than it is for treating insomnia.

January 15, 2014  |

This article  first appeared in The Fix, which features coverage on addiction and recovery, straight up.

On March 29, 2009, Robert Stewart, 45, stormed into the Pinelake Health and Rehab nursing home in Carthage, North Carolina and opened fire, killing eight people and wounding two. Stewart’s apparent target was his estranged wife, who worked as a nurse in the home. She hid in a bathroom and was unharmed. Stewart was charged with eight counts of first-degree murder; if convicted, he could face the death penalty. Even though there was evidence that Stewart’s actions were premeditated (he allegedly had a target), Stewart’s defense team successfully argued that since he was under the influence of Ambien, a sleep aid, at the time of the shooting, he was not in control of his actions. Instead of the charges sought by the prosecutors, Stewart was convicted on eight counts of second-degree murder. He received 142 – 179 years in prison.

http://www.alternet.org/drugs/americas-number-one-prescription-sleep-aid-could-trigger-zombies-murder-and-other-disturbing?ak_proof=1&akid=.1121926.wDJK8-&rd=1&src=newsletter948677&t=11