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4th Case Associated with Measles Outbreak in Ocean County

flu-fever

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Trenton NJ, The New Jersey Department of Health is warning residents that a 4th case of measles — a highly contagious disease — has been confirmed in Ocean County. This individual could have exposed others to the infection while in Ocean County on October 31.

Anyone who visited CHEMED Health Center, 1771 Madison Ave, Lakewood, NJ 08701 on October 31 between 8:45 a.m. and 1 p.m. may have been exposed to measles.

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Virus Outbreak at the Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation Leaves 6 Children Dead

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Haskell NJ, A viral outbreak has left six children dead and 12 others sick at a New Jersey rehabilitation facility, according to health officials. The New Jersey Department of Health, says there have been 18 cases of adenovirus among pediatric residents at the Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation, located in Haskell.

Adenoviruses are a family of viruses that can infect the tissue linings of the respiratory tract, eyes, intestines, urinary tract and nervous system. They are a common cause of illnesses ranging from a cold to bronchitis to pneumonia and even pink eye, particularly in young children. The children at Wanaque appear to have been more susceptible to serious infections due to their other medical conditions.

Governor Phil Murphy commented on the Adenovirus Outbreak at the Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation

“I am heartbroken by the news that several children have lost their lives in an adenovirus outbreak at the Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation, and pray for the full recovery of the other children impacted. I have been briefed by Dr. Elnahal, who has assured me that the Department of Health has recommended vital measures to enhance protections against the further spread of infection and will continue its active on-site surveillance. I am confident that the steps being taken by state and local officials will minimize the impact to all those who remain at the facility, including patients and employees.”

 

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New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection : West Nile Virus

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection , with reports of West Nile virus illnesses in people at a record level and persistent warm and rainy weather, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and New Jersey Department of Health are urging property owners to take steps to reduce mosquito populations and to protect themselves against the risk of mosquito-borne illnesses.

Both agencies are also working coordinating with officials in Bergen County to continue monitoring, tracking and spraying efforts as well as public education. The county recently experienced two West Nile-related deaths.

Mosquitoes can breed even in the smallest amount of water. Dump all water that collects in your back yard to reduce mosquito risks!

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The Ridgewood Heath Department Reminds You Warm Weather Brings Ticks

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, The Ridgewood Heath Department and the New Jersey Department of Health remind you that the warm weather brings ticks and Lyme disease. Lyme disease is an illness caused by infection with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (boar-ELL-ee-uh burg-dorf-ERR-eye). This bacterium is carried by ticks. This infection can cause a variety of symptoms and if left untreated can be severe.

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The “Flu” Outbreak Information for Schools

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February 20,2018

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Trenton NJ,  The New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) is currently reporting widespread influenza (flu) activity in all regions of the state. The flu can cause mild to severe illness. Young children, older people and people with certain health conditions are among the people who are at high risk of serious flu complications. Serious outcomes of flu infection can result in hospitalizations or sometimes death. NJDOH has been receiving numerous outbreak reports which have generated questions from school and local health departments on reporting requirements. Below are answers to some of the most common questions we are receiving as well as links to valuable resources schools can use. What should schools expect to see during widespread flu activity? With widespread influenza activity, schools should expect to experience increased absenteeism among students and staff with respiratory symptoms. NJDOH recommends that schools continue to monitor students and staff for sudden fever and respiratory illness symptoms. What should school do about increased absenteeism for influenza like illness (ILI)? NJDOH recommends that schools and childcare settings monitor attendees for sudden fever and respiratory illness symptoms. School or childcare attendees and staff with sudden fever and respiratory illness symptoms should be sent home with instructions to stay at home until fever free for 24 hours without fever reducing medication. Instructions should be given to seek medical care with worsening of symptoms.

How does a school know if a respiratory outbreak is occurring? Often in the school setting, it is difficult to determine if an outbreak exists. An outbreak may be occurring if you are experiencing clusters of ill students and/or staff that are in the same classroom, same grade or wing of the facility or have attended a common event. If you think an outbreak may be occurring, contact your local health department for guidance. During flu season we would expect a school to experience cases of flu or ILI. Unless you are experiencing clusters as described above and in the NJDOH General Guidelines for the Control of Outbreaks in School and Child Care Settings, it is not necessary to contact public health. What should a school do if they are experiencing an outbreak of ILI? If you suspect an outbreak is occurring, the school should report the outbreak to the local health department to ensure that public health recommendations are implemented. Some control measures that a school will be asked to implement include:  Isolating ill students/staff from well students/staff until they can be sent home.

 Increasing frequency of cleaning of common areas and frequently touched surfaces.  Encouraging frequent hand hygiene.  Reinforcing respiratory etiquette to students and staff.

What preventative measures should a school take? NJDOH recommends that schools and childcare setting increase education on respiratory hygiene. Staff and children (as developmentally appropriate) should all be taught and asked to follow these steps that prevent the transmission of infections such as influenza:  Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue or into your sleeve, not your hands.  Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.  Wash hands frequently, especially after coughing or sneezing.  Stay home if you’re sick, especially with a fever.

Additional preventative measures include:  Routine cleaning and disinfecting of frequently touched surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like flu.  Have an adequate supply of tissues, soap, paper towels, alcohol-based hand rubs and disposable wipes.  Adhere to exclusion recommendations from public health. For ILI; fever free for 24 hours without fever reducing medication. Doctors notes for return do not supersede public health recommendation.

When should a school close for outbreaks?

Although school dismissal and closure are not recommended for the control of seasonal flu, schools should work with state and local health officials to determine if and when you should dismiss students based on the severity of disease in your school community. Some schools may decide to close based on local considerations, such as high student and staff absenteeism. If this is the case, schools should consult public health and school district medical personnel before closing. Schools should update emergency plans, so they are in place before an outbreak occurs.

The New Jersey Department of Health asks that everyone take steps to prevent the flu:  Get a flu shot – it’s not too late to be protected!  Wash hands often.  Cover coughs and sneezes with your sleeve or a tissue.  Avoid sick people.  Stay home if sick. Keep students home if they are sick too.

School outbreak guidance and exclusion information can be found at http://nj.gov/health/cd/topics/outbreaks.shtml#2. For information about flu, go to the New Jersey Department of Health flu website at http://nj.gov/health/cd/topics/flu.shtml.

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Measles, again — baby could have spread infection in northern NJ

New Jersey Department of Health

By Adam Hochron January 30, 2017 6:17 PM

WAYNE — The New Jersey Department of Health has confirmed a travel-related case of measles in Passaic County.

According to the department, the disease was found in an unvaccinated 7-month-old who had come to the state through international travel, and who may have exposed others between Jan. 17 and 23, including at two local hospitals.

The child visited the emergency department of St. Joseph’s Wayne Hospital from just before 7 a.m until 1 p.m. on Jan. 21, according to the health department. The child as at the Pediatric Emergency Department at St. Joseph’s Regional Medical Center two days later from 6:30 a.m. until 3:45 p.m.

While it has been more than a week since the child was at either hospital, and is currently recovering at home, the health department warned that symptoms may not develop until as late as Feb. 15.

Also, according to the health department, this case of travel-related measles is not connected to a man from Hudson County who also contracted the disease traveling abroad.

Read More: Measles, again — baby could have spread infection in northern NJ | http://nj1015.com/measles-again-baby-could-have-spread-infection-in-northern-nj/?trackback=tsmclip

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Christie Administration Announces Funding to Combat Opioid Overdose Epidemic

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Wednesday, August 31, 2016

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Trenton, NJ – Governor Chris Christie today announced The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has awarded the New Jersey Department of Health (DOH) a $727,688 competitive grant to enhance efforts to curb the opioid crisis through a series of initiatives and the New Jersey Department of Human Services (DHS) approximately $6.9 million to target prescription and opioid misuse.

“Today is International Overdose Awareness Day, a reminder that the disease of addiction is preventable through education and intervention,” said Governor Christie.  “These funding grants are another important step in combating opioid misuse and abuse in New Jersey while strengthening our ability to positively impact the opioid crisis in our state by saving lives.”

Funding for DOH  will enable the agency to enhance its data access and analysis; improve prevention planning, including implementing a statewide strategic plan; assess the impact of state-level policies on the opioid crisis; identify and engage communities most impacted by the effects of the opioid crisis; and maximize the New Jersey Prescription Monitoring Program’s public health surveillance potential.

The CDC’s Prescription Drug Overdose Prevention grant helps states combat ongoing prescription drug overdose challenges. The purpose is to provide state health departments with resources and support needed to advance interventions for preventing prescription drug overdoses.

Through 2019, CDC plans to give selected states annual awards between $750,000 and $1 million to advance prevention in four key areas: maximizing prescription drug monitoring programs; community, insurer or health systems interventions; policy evaluations and Rapid Response projects.

Through SAMHSA, DHS  will receive a Strategic Prevention Framework for Prescription Drugs five-year grant award for approximately $1.9 million to target prescription drug misuse. The program is designed to raise awareness about the dangers of sharing medications and educate pharmaceutical and medical communities on the risks of overprescribing to young adults.

This grant also will fund prescription drug abuse prevention activities and education to schools, communities, parents, prescribers, and their patients. SAMHSA will track reductions in opioid overdoses and the incorporation of Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) data into needs assessments and strategic plans as indicators of the program’s success. The cooperative agreement between DHS and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) calls for up to 25 awards of about $371,616 annually.

The reports developed from the DHS’ Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) data analysis will be shared with other state agencies and with DMHAS’ Regional Prevention Coalitions to inform planning in local communities.

In addition, DHS is receiving $5 million to target the reduction of the number of prescription drug/opioid overdose related deaths and adverse events among 18 year olds and older.  The grant will focus on training key community sectors on the prevention of prescription drug/opioid overdose related deaths and implementing prevention strategies, including the purchase and distribution of naloxone kits. A cooperative agreement between DHS and SAMHSA calls for up to 11 awards of $1million annually.

International Overdose Awareness Day is a global event held annually on August 31 that aims to raise awareness of overdoses and reduce the stigma of drug-related deaths. It also acknowledges the grief felt by families and friends who have experienced death or permanent injury as a result of drug overdoses.