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VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE COUNCIL SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING NOVEMBER 7, 2018 7:30 P.M.

VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE COUNCIL SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING NOVEMBER 7, 2018 7:30 P.M.

1. Call to Order – Mayor

2. Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meeting Act

MAYOR: “Adequate notice of this meeting has been provided
by a posting on the bulletin board in Village Hall,
by mail to the Ridgewood News, The Record, and by submission to all persons entitled to same as provided by law of a schedule including the date and time of this meeting.”

Continue reading VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE COUNCIL SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING NOVEMBER 7, 2018 7:30 P.M.

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2018 Bergen County Historic Preservation Awards : The Dedicated Life honoring Ridgewood’s Isabella Altano, recipient 2018 Preservation Leadership Award, posthumously

May 17,2018

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, 2018 Bergen County Historic Preservation Awards – The Dedicated Life honoring Isabella Altano, recipient 2018 Preservation Leadership Award, posthumously. Isabella worked tirelessly to save the historic Zabriskie-Schedler Jersey Dutch framed house.

“Isabella Cirilli Altano, 63, Ridgewood, New Jersey. Born in Molfetta, Italy, she came to America in 1969 at 15, settling in Jersey City, where she met her future husband, Brian Altano. The couple has been married for 39 years. Isabella earned an A.A. from Bergen Community College (B.C.C.), a B.A. from Columbia University, and a Masters in Architecture from Pratt Institute. She practiced architecture in Bergen County, specializing in educational facilities and hospitals. She was also an adjunct professor of Design at B.C.C., where she taught for 20 years. An indefatigable community activist, she spearheaded the drive to preserve the Zabriskie Schedler House in Ridgewood and have a park constructed on the property. She was also on the Board of Directors of the League of Women Voters of Bergen County and a member of the Ridgewood Planning Board and the town’s historic commission.”

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Colonial Paramus’ rich history — however you spell it — is really Ridgewood’s history to celebrate

ridgewood paramus

March 11,2018

by John Paquin‎
Originally posted Vintage Ridgewood New Jersey

Ridgewood NJ, How do you spell “Paramus”? “R-I-D-G-E-W-O-O-D”! Colonial Paramus’ rich history — however you spell it — is really Ridgewood’s history to celebrate, and the Zabriskie-Schedler House is a visible, physical tie to that past that Ridgewood taxpayers own, and owe to future generations.

But how do you really spell it? Let’s count some of the ways.

First, the name is Lenape or more properly Munsee, the local branch of the Lenape indian nation that occupied the land along the “Sadle River” when the first Dutch settlers arrived circa 1675. It’s most commonly thought to mean “land of turkeys” (which, as Jackie Hone correctly pointed out — is true once again!).

The indians of course did not “spell” it, but they did convey the name to the “original owner” Albert Zabriskie (yes that family — more on that later).

Here’s some of the many spellings:

Parames: 1708 English deed
Perampsepus: 1709 Indian grant
Peremis: 1731 call for minister for the church
Pyramus: 1780 George Washington correspondence
Perhamus: 1780 directions to the church from Albert Zabriskie — another one — a Tory! — to the British for their attack.
Paramus: Col. McPherson in his report of that attack
Paramus: auditing report for the building of the “new” church” in 1803

So the modern spelling seems to have firmly taken hold by the turn of the 19th C.

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History in the Small Details of Zabriskie Schedler House in Ridgewood

Zabriskie Schedler House

by John Paquin

Posted first on Vintage Ridgewood Facebook Page

Ridgewood NJ, Separated at Birth — and by about a half a mile. Are these the coolest door knobs you’ve ever seen? The one on the left is in the Ackerman-Naugle House on East Saddle River Road — that cool Jersey Dutch stone house discussed earlier right across 17 from the church, and the other is from what else but the Zabriskie Schedler House we’ve been talking about on West Saddle River Rd. Both these houses were part of the original settlement of “Pyramus”, and both are still with us. They look positively ancient and really bring that period to life when you see and touch something like that. Might, say, someone like Alexander Hamilton have turned one of those knobs? Or Mr. Burr?
Actually, yes. I asked noted Jersey Dutch Architecture expert Tim Adrience about these and he explained: “The latch….is called an iron plate spring latch. That type of latch is found in a number of houses in Bergen County, and it is better than a thumb latch in operation. This type of latch was made from roughly the 1740’s to the 1830’s, and is only found on interior doors”.

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Reader says Starting work without a historical study? How do you know the house is really historical?

01_george_washington[1]

Junk! Starting work without a historical study? How do you know the house is really historical? The first evaluator said that the center portion “might be historic”. Is the “might be” the only evaluation you have? And we’re spending a fortune on it for a roof alone when we don’t know if the building itself is worth it? Remember the historical listing makes it only “of interest” and “makes the house available for further documentation”. Do we have any actual reliable facts? And I thought the plans were to tear down the non-historical part (which compose most of the building)? We’re roofing the whole thing? Why do we want to support anything but the truly historical (if it can be proven) part–the kitchen, main room, and probably a downstairs (no original upper floors) bedroom. The rest of it is pure unadulterated junk!!!

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Zabriskie-Schedler house on the Public Meeting Agenda tonight!

Zabriskie-Schedler house

February 28,2018

John Paquin

posted for in Vintage Ridgewood New Jersey Facebook group

Ridgewood NJ, Zabriskie-Schedler house Public Meetings tonight @ 7:30! Come support the House! Great things on the agenda as the Mayor noted in her post. Getting a new roof and potential archeological study. The Dutch Gambrel roof on this house is both it’s most distinctive and threatened feature, and with no roof there’s no house. so getting this right is really important. Very special skill set. And just imagine what’s in the earth there. Hard to believe the roar of 17 is right next door. the ground is literally littered with the remains of old dressed sandstone foundations. You practically trip over them. Outbuildings? Haybarracks? soldier’s firepits?

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VILLAGE COUNCIL OF RIDGEWOOD SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING : Prequalification Regulations for Prospective Bidders for the Roof Restoration for the Zabriskie-Schedler House

Zabriskie-Schedler House

Village Council Special Meeting
AGENDA
VILLAGE COUNCIL SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING
SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM
FEBRUARY 28, 2018
7:30 P.M.
1. Call to Order
2. Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meeting Act
MAYOR: “Adequate notice of this meeting has been provided by a posting on the bulletin board in Village hall, by mail to the Ridgewood News, The Record, and by submission to all persons entitled to same as provided by law of a schedule including the date and time of this meeting.”
3. Roll Call – Village Clerk
4. Public Hearing on Prequalification Regulations for Prospective Bidders for the Roof Restoration for the Zabriskie-Schedler House
5. Resolution #18-72 – Adopt Prequalification Regulations for Utilization in Connection with Controlling the Qualifications of Prospective Bidders for Restoration of the Roof for the Zabriskie-Schedler House
6. Adjournment

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So what exactly did the Zabriskie-Schedler House in Ridgewood actually look like?

Zabriskie-Schedler House , American History ,

February 19,2018

by John Paquin

Ridgewood NJ, So what exactly did the Zabriskie-Schedler House actually look like? Like this! Thought that might help the discussion. And best part is it’s all still right there. This is from a photo taken yesterday. the early and mid-20th C. additions have been stripped away — porches, dormer etc., to reveal the original structure. Chimneys “repaired”. Cedar shake siding that was likely done in the ’30’s removed to reveal the clapboard, corner boards and water board still almost certainly underneath. What you see is a classic farmhouse in the Federal style, popular between 1780-1830 or so. But built in the Dutch manner. in that regard very different from the dutch stone houses of the area. Federal style was typified by a simple clean approach, with broad, plain surfaces and “attenuated” detail — modest and clean. All reflecting the mood of the early republic. So modest details, minimal facia/soffits and overhang, and simple entry with plain transom. But that’s not to say this was a house of modest means! At a time when most houses in the area were a single story with a garret up above, a full second story would have been for someone of affluence. The simplicity is more a reflection of the style of the day. Historian @peggynorris in her great foundational work on this house shows that Mr. Zabriskie bought the land from the church in 1825, and that’s exactly when I would have placed this based on physical evidence. I suspect he began construction that year. But there’s a puzzle! we know the tree is about 230 years old — there since the republic’s founding in 1787! But that’s 35 years before the house. The architects who surveyed the property noted that the smaller wing may actually be earlier. I agree, and think the tree’s age, and this cleaned up image support that view. Simple, one-room houses were common for area tenant farmers. I think the wing is late 18th C., pre-dates the main house (and even Mr. Zabriskie’s ownership) and possibly as old as the tree. To the right there’s a fenced-in corn field across The West Saddle River Rd., and a period hay barrack back in the North Field. There are two liberties taken here: the Tree is it’s present size tho of course it should be much smaller. and the well and well-sweep are in the front year when in fact the remains of the well are in the same approx. position but behind the house. But here’s the thing — this is all present today. Relatively simple to return this house to it’s period correct appearance. I know cause I’ve done it myself.

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Reader says I hope the Village doesn’t make a mess of Zabriskie-Schedler House like they did at Habernickel

Schedler Park

Yes hopefully whatever they do over there you get more consideration that the habernickel neighborhood. Those people got fields that host 2 different sports games and practices and then a slap in the face with a private business that has bus after bus come and go. The business was given a large price of property and 12 parking spots. Village employees are constantly there doing one thing or another to help this business do well and all on Ridgewood tax payers dime. $20.000 front steps!!! When a family lived there the village did not have the maintenance it has now and our town sports had parking. Lose lose for us tax payers. Win win for healthbarn. Who are the fools now?

Maybe they can develop it into fields like habernickel and take away the peace and quiet that exists in that neighborhood too. And then after you put fields there you can add a for profit business like at habernickel that is generating a very large income for the private owner yet causing disturbances in the neighborhood on an hourly basis. Then if that isn’t enough utilize the passive side for children’s lacrosse because we all know how peaceful it is to have screaming kids and coaches in your backyard. Maybe schedler folk would enjoy all that the habernickel folk have to endure!! It is really great when it all happens at once. The never ending goings on of the private business, soccer and baseball practice on the fields and parks and rec lacrosse programs

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Reader says We would never be on the hook for $635,000 at Schedler, These are matching grants

zabriskieschedler_theridgewoodblog

We would never be on the hook for $635,000. These are matching grants. If the grant applications(Phase1 and Phase 11) are not approved the town would have to go back to the drawing board with all that the process would entail: resolutions ,public hearings, etc. The original request from the Schedler group was a matching grant in the amount of 90,000 dollars with 45,000 dollars in an account raised by the advocates to ensure the beginning steps for saving the house ( roof, mold treatment,etc.) The council at that time voted against this grant application knowing full well that they would not be out any money. It took years to make the Stable what it is today. When money is available in the budget,fund raising and or grants, additional work will ensue. The past council was in favor of a 90 foot baseball diamond(field). The original plans for this would have entailed removal of all trees, the house and possibly a wall which the DOT would not have paid for and would have cost upwards of a million dollars. Schedler advocates want to see a long term plan for the entire property which would include the house, an all purpose grass field, a possible play ground and walking trail and the trees! Worthy goals at a price we can afford and may take several years to complete based on the willingness to do so and budgetary constraints.