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Reader Says Grads Fleeing the State ,”It’s actually a yearly testament to the consistently high comparative standards of our best high schools, including RHS”

“The flight of New Jersey high school graduates has a big part of its origin in the sheer quality of their academic records, putting them, as a group, at a competitive advantage over the high school graduates of more or less all other U.S. states. For example, In no other US. state is the competition as stiff, year in and year out, as it is in New Jersey for the status of National Merit Commended Student, National Merit Semifinalist and National Merit Finalist, all of which are limited to a fixed (and miniscule) percentage of the total number of sophomore PSAT test takers in New Jersey. The sheer number of top shelf high school graduates New Jersey consistently produces every year compared to those of all other states, even other Northeast states, is remarkable. Top colleges all around the country regularly lure a huge chunk of our best graduates out of state to pursue their undergraduate degrees. Why? Because without those top NJ HS grads leavening their incoming freshman class every year the average credentials of their respective student bodies would objectively begin to slip and make them less competitive over time. Is it a really any surprise that many of our high school graduates don’t return after college? It’s actually a yearly testament to the consistently high comparative standards of our best high schools, including RHS.”

3 thoughts on “Reader Says Grads Fleeing the State ,”It’s actually a yearly testament to the consistently high comparative standards of our best high schools, including RHS”

  1. Lol, what a load of crap this is….
    “Status of national merit commended student”?
    Really?
    “Sheer quality of their academic record”?
    Really?
    How about their finally out of the shithole that is NJ
    and out from under the complete bullshit that you and their parents force fed them for years…literally every point you made above. You sound like a realtor in town laying the bullshit on some rube from Brooklyn.

  2. “Really?”

    Yeah, really.

    The PSAT/National Merit system affords an annual snapshot of the collective academic horsepower under the respective hoods of each state’s most academically proficient high school juniors.

    Out of all fifty states, the competition for National Merit recognition is the absolute toughest in New Jersey.(Remember, every junior student across the country who takes the PSAT as part of the National Merit selection process takes the exact same test on the exact same day.) Hence, New Jersey’s juniors are the most academically competitive of any state. New Jersey would be the LAST state in which you would want to go to high school in if your SOLE goal is to be recognized as among the best-qualified juniors IN YOUR STATE. On the other hand, New Jersey is the FIRST state in which you would want to go to high school if your SOLE goal is to be recognized as the best-qualified junior in the U.S.A.

    Consider the following
    (from
    https://www.compassprep.com/national-merit-semifinalist-cutoffs/
    ):

    “The [Selection Index] high-water mark [that will be applied in the case of juniors who took the PSAT in Fall 2018, and are scheduled to graduate in Spring 2020] is likely to remain at 223.

    “We believe that a 224 cutoff is a remote possibility. New Jersey is the state that has traditionally had the highest cutoffs, although it was joined at 223 by California, Maryland, and Massachusetts for the class of 2019. New Jersey has the highest probability of an upward shift in this group. A cutoff higher than 224 is, simply, not a possibility in any state or selection unit.  The cutoffs on the redesigned PSAT reach a natural limit. There are few score combinations that can even produce 225–228 Selection Indexes and not a sufficient number of students hitting those combinations.”

    The Ridgewood School District, including its flagship eponymous high school, consists entirely of public schools. As with all public school districts of any significant size these days (and the Ridgewood district is fairly big), entropy weighs heavily, tending to reduce the quality of instruction every year. It’s just that Ridgewood, and a fair number of other New Jersey public school districts, mostly located in the northern part of the state, manage to get worse MORE SLOWLY than public school districts of similar size in every other state. Give faint praise where faint praise is due!

  3. Thank you, you just proved that you are a complete
    Asshole…

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