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Reader sound off on $111 Million Ridgewood School Budget vote

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211 voter spread yes vs no

we had a chance to send a message of constraint but the non voters
in an ironic way let the spenders spend.

it’s not their fault individually but when the tax bill comes
non voters dig deep into a pocket of regrets.

towns spending and BOE BUDGETS non sustainable
and is a runaway train signaling time to paint and sell.

wait till the developers get ahold of valley campus..schools
will be flooded with new children.

9 out of 19 districts voted majority “No”. Absentee ballots accounted for 3/4 of the margin of victory for “Yes”. The B of E was nearly embarrassed here.

11 thoughts on “Reader sound off on $111 Million Ridgewood School Budget vote

  1. It is the indifference of residents that is killing this town. Spring break or no spring break, those who are interested to vote would have found a way to do it. People who move here anew just do not care to get involved in local issues. They come mainly from metropolitan area and have the typical indifferent mindset. They are under the false impression that everything is prefect in this place they chose to live especially the schools. Half the village has no idea what high density housing is and how the place is being transformed into a mini city or how the RHS is approaching 2000 students and is the size of a small college.
    Developers and narrow minded local politicians love this kind of place where they can easily make $$$ without any major trouble.

  2. I agree with the concerns about indifference. I did vote but it really is a meaningless vote. Nothing of substance can change no matter what the vote which is likely the main reason people don’t vote in that one. I do think people are concerned about the development and I am in the majority of us hoping and praying it does not destroy our hometown. Although you should know back in the late 70’s early 80’s the class sizes were 550 to 600 per grade so ….. much bigger than now and with smaller buildings. I don’t think we had inferior education back when RHS could only fit Sophomore Junior and Seniors and Freshmen went to BF and GW. So I don’t think we should be using that as the reason to oppose overbuilding. That fact aside, nobody wants Ridgewood to become a small city and the number of apartments and condos going up is alarming everybody and it does risk transforming the town. We need to be vigilant. Hopefully the new housing gets mostly filled with Ridgewood senior citizens (if the Gov doesn’t chase them all away with taxes).

  3. I think those of you who lament the residents who did not vote (apparently assuming they would vote no) should consider the reality that while you no doubt strongly believe your viewpoint is right, there are those who honestly disagree with you. It’s not that anyone enjoys paying taxes. While taxes are high, some people believe it’s worth it for the services they get. Some people think it’s a good thing to bring luxury rentals into the downtown area. Some people think the changes taking place reflect a natural evolution of the town to meet the realities of how many people want to live in 2019. You clearly do not feel that way and you’re entitled to your opinion. And you’re entitled to advocate your perspective and vote your viewpoint in an election. And when you lose, you can either decide to accept it or leave. Please don’t be bitter and assume those who voted the other way or didn’t vote are new to the town or from metropolitan areas (as if that inherently makes their opinion less valid) or are stupid. Just accept that your view didn’t win the argument. Feel free to try again next year, but don’t insult those who feel differently.

  4. “I think those of you who lament….”

    Finally, a voice of reason. Kudos.

  5. doesn’t matter if they voted yes or no, its stepping up to the plate and owning the process, as opposed to later whining about taxes.

  6. The four-year high school experience is superior. Optimal. By contrast the three-year high school experience jams too much necessary growth as a teenage student into too little time. Blink once, and one is already a junior, trying to recover GPA-wise from that C you got from an unexpectedly tough class. Blink again, and senior year is half over and one’s brain is already drifting off, dreaming about graduation and what comes next. It would be regrettable if RHS were forced by district overpopulation to revert to being a three-year school.

  7. RE: ““I think those of you who lament….”
    Finally, a voice of reason. Kudos.”

    .
    I think you should consider the reality that while you no doubt strongly believe your viewpoint is right, there are those who honestly disagree with you…
    .

  8. A 14% voting turnout is pathetic. I agree there is no reason to lament on the vote, even if it was a no vote the board would still get most of everything they wanted. Hawk’s point of indifference is so true.

  9. Grammar school as grades K-6, junior high as grades 7-8-9, followed by a three-year high school worked well for many, many years. It does not involve jamming four years of high school into three. It separates often-still-young 9th graders from older children, and socially this can be helpful. I had that experience in another NJ suburb many decades ago and liked it fine. And it was fine for children here for a long time.

  10. “I think you should consider the reality that while you no doubt strongly believe your viewpoint is right, there are those who honestly disagree with you…”

    Unfortunately, they would be wrong.

  11. “Unfortunately, they would be wrong.”
    .
    I think you should consider the reality that while you no doubt strongly believe your viewpoint is right, there are those who honestly disagree with you…
    .

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