Internet shaming spreads everywhere and lives forever. We need a way to fight it.
by
Megan McArdle
@asymmetricinfoMore stories by Megan McArdle

‎August‎ ‎22‎, ‎2017‎ ‎9‎:‎06‎ ‎AM‎ ‎EDT

James Damore, the author of the notorious Google memo, has had his 15 minutes of fame. In six months, few of us will be able to remember his name. But Google will remember — not the company, but the search engine. For the rest of his life, every time he meets someone new or applies for a job, the first thing they will learn about him, and probably the only thing, is that he wrote a document that caused an internet uproar.

The internet did not invent the public relations disaster, or the summary firing to make said disaster go away. What the internet changed is the scale of the disasters, and the number of people who are vulnerable to them, and the cold implacable permanence of the wreckage they leave behind.

Try to imagine the Damore story happening 20 years ago. It’s nearly impossible, isn’t it? Take a company of similar scope and power to Google — Microsoft, say. Would any reporter in 1997 have cared that some Microsoft engineer she’d never heard of had written a memo his co-workers considered sexist? Probably not. It was more likely a problem for Microsoft HR, or just angry water-cooler conversations.

https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2017-08-22/we-live-in-fear-of-the-online-mobs