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Keeping Bears at Bay: Tips for Responsible Waste Management

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, as we coexist with wildlife in our communities, it’s crucial to recognize that human garbage can be an irresistible temptation for black bears. When bears rummage through trash bins, they may become accustomed to finding easy meals, leading to repeated visits and potential conflicts. To foster harmony between humans and bears, it’s essential for residents to adopt responsible waste management practices. Here are some tips to help minimize bear encounters and protect both people and wildlife.

Continue reading Keeping Bears at Bay: Tips for Responsible Waste Management

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RESIDENTS URGED TO BE AWARE OF BLACK BEARS

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file photo by Boyd Loving

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, as black bears emerge from their dens this spring, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection is reminding residents and outdoor enthusiasts to take steps to reduce the potential for encounters, including reducing food sources, such as unsecured trash, that can attract bears.

Continue reading RESIDENTS URGED TO BE AWARE OF BLACK BEARS

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Black Bears Making the Rounds in North Jersey

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Oradell NJ, Oradell PBA reported a bear has been spotted on the New Milford / Oradell border near the County Property (Old Water Company Buildings). Do not approach it if seen and call 911 to report its location. We previously reported a bear was spotted in Hawthorne and Twp of Washington.

Continue reading Black Bears Making the Rounds in North Jersey

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Bear Sighted in Hawthorne

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the staff of the Ridgewo0d blog

Hawthorne NJ, Hawthorne Police reported a bear sighting in an amusing post , “Hi, I’m Kevin. I hear one of my family members has been spotted in the area of Goffle Hill and Fairview. Just so you know, he’s totally cool and isn’t gonna bother anyone. No need to be afraid.”

Continue reading Bear Sighted in Hawthorne

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The New Jersey Outdoor Alliance Calls On Governor To Reopen State Lands To Bear Hunters

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, The New Jersey Outdoor Alliance on Monday released a statement calling on the Murphy Administration to reverse his policy and reopen state lands to hunters ahead of the approaching December bear hunting season segment.

Continue reading The New Jersey Outdoor Alliance Calls On Governor To Reopen State Lands To Bear Hunters
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Sportsmen coalition speaks out against the restriction of sportsmen from the public lands they pay for

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Trenton NJ, The New Jersey Outdoor Alliance on Tuesday released a statement condemning comments made by Governor Phil Murphy on News12 New Jersey’s “Ask Governor Murphy” program indicating he is “1,000% committed” to ending the New Jersey black bear hunt, referring to a campaign promise made in his 2017 run for Governor.

“For a sitting Governor to fly directly in the face of scientists and experts that urge the continuation of this conservation management tool to score some points with extremists is absurd.” said NJOA spokesman Cody McLaughlin, “He said he was ‘1,000% committed’ to ending the bear hunt, but what he was really saying was he was 1,000% committed to rejecting the scientific consensus on New Jersey’s bear population.”

Continue reading Sportsmen coalition speaks out against the restriction of sportsmen from the public lands they pay for
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Animal Activist Disrupt Scientific Bear Research by the New Jersey Division Of Fish and Wildlife

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Sportsmen’s group calls out anti-hunting extremist groups for perpetuating hysteria that is detrimental to scientific progress.

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, The New Jersey Outdoor Alliance on Thursday released a statement condemning the actions of anti-hunting, anti-science political extremists from the Animal Protection League of New Jersey for their role in promoting the interruption of key scientific bear research conducted by the New Jersey Division Of Fish and Wildlife.

“This is a great example of how violent anti-hunting extremist organizations interfere with valid and badly-needed scientific research” said NJOA spokesman Cody McLaughlin, “On the one hand, extremists harass Division Of Fish and Wildlife scientists while performing their essential research and promote a ban on traps that assist the Division in such research – while in the same breath promoting their preposterous ‘bear vasectomy’ talking point. Which is it? It’s neither. Just another bad faith argument pushing an agenda.”

Continue reading Animal Activist Disrupt Scientific Bear Research by the New Jersey Division Of Fish and Wildlife
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Bear Sightings in the Boro of Allendale

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July 7,2018

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Allendale NJ, Allendale Police are continuing to get reports of bear sightings throughout the Boro. If you see a bear, remember to keep your distance and keep children and pets indoors.

It’s that time of year when bear cubs will again be passing through our area. The Allendale Police will again be monitoring the situation and encourage residents to continue reporting any sightings to the police by calling 201-825-1900.

As a general reminder, keep your distance from any wild animals, including but not limited to bears and coyotes. If you see a bear or coyote, bring pets and children inside until the animal leaves the area. Bears are attracted to neighborhoods by garbage odors. Properly securing your garbage is one of the best ways to prevent bears from becoming a nuisance in our community. For more bear safety tips, please visit the NJ DEP Fish and Wildlife website at

https://www.njfishandwildlife.com/bearfacts.htm or contact the Allendale Police.
Here’s some additional info on bear activity in Allendale:

https://www.celeryfarm.net/2018/03/exclusive-bear-pix.htm

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NJ Department of Environmental Protection’s Division of Fish and Wildlife offers Safety Tips As Black Bears Enter Active Spring Period

Bears

May 30,2018

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, The Department of Environmental Protection’s Division of Fish and Wildlife is providing property owners and outdoor enthusiasts with safety tips as black bears search for food after emerging from winter dens.
“At this time of year, it is important for residents who live in New Jersey’s bear country to be aware of some steps they can follow to reduce the chances of a bear coming onto their properties,” said Assistant Commissioner for Natural and Historic Resources Ray Bukowski. “It is also a good time for anyone who spends time outdoors to become familiar with ways to stay safe.”
Black bears have been sighted in all of New Jersey’s 21 counties but the population is most dense in the northwestern counties of Sussex, Warren, Passaic and Morris.
Bears are not true hibernators but enter a state of winter dormancy known as torpor. During torpor they may lose up to 20 percent of their body weight. They need to restore this weight for the mating season, which begins in late May and continues well into summer.

One of their primary natural food sources in spring is skunk cabbage, a leafy plant that grows along edges of rivers, streams and wetlands. Other natural food sources include grasses, forbs, tubers, bulbs and insects. They may also feed on carrion.

Bears have an acute sense of smell and can detect scents over great distances, so great care must be taken to prevent bears from being attracted to other food sources around properties, such as trash, food residue on grills, bird seed and pet food.

“Although bears are by nature wary of people, animals attracted to neighborhoods may learn to associate people with food,” said Division of Fish and Wildlife Director Larry Herrighty. “These animals may become nuisance bears that may cause property damage or seek handouts from people.”
Intentional feeding of a bear is dangerous and illegal and carries a fine of up to $1,000.
The Division of Fish and Wildlife offers the following tips for property owners to minimize encounters with bears:
* Secure trash and eliminate obvious sources of food, such as pet food, easy-to-reach bird feeders, or food residue in barbecue grills.
* Use certified bear-resistant garbage containers if possible. Otherwise, store all garbage in containers with tight-fitting lids and place them along the inside walls of a garage, or in the basement, a sturdy shed, or other secure area.
* Wash garbage containers frequently with a disinfectant solution to remove odors. Put out garbage on collection day, not the night before.
* Avoid feeding birds when bears are active. If you do choose to feed birds, do so during daylight hours only and bring feeders indoors at night. Suspend birdfeeders from a free-hanging wire, making sure they are at least 10 feet off the ground. Clean up spilled seeds and shells daily.
* Immediately remove all uneaten food and food bowls used by pets fed outdoors.
* Clean outdoor grills and utensils to remove food and grease residue. Store grills securely.
* Do not place meat or any sweet foods in compost piles.
* Remove fruit or nuts that fall from trees in your yard.
* Install electric fencing as an effective way to protect crops, beehives, and livestock.
If you encounter a black bear in your neighborhood or outdoors while hiking, fishing or camping, follow these safety tips:
* Remain calm. Never run from a bear. Instead, slowly back away. Avoid direct eye contact, which may be perceived by a bear as a challenge. Make sure the bear has an escape route.
* To scare the bear away, make loud noises by yelling, using a whistle, banging pots and pans, or sounding an air horn. Make yourself look as big as possible by waving your arms. If you are with someone else, stand close together with your arms raised above your head.
* Make bears aware of your presence by speaking in an assertive voice, singing, clapping your hands, or making other noises. If hiking through bear country, always make your presence known through loud talking or clapping of hands.
* The bear may utter a series of huffs, make popping sounds by snapping its jaws and swatting the ground. These are warning signs that you are too close. Slowly back away, avoid direct eye contact. Do not run.
* If a bear stands on its hind legs or moves closer, it may be trying to get a better view or detect scents in the air. This is usually not a threatening behavior.
* Black bears will sometimes “bluff charge” when cornered, threatened, or attempting to steal food. Stand your ground, avoid direct eye contact, then slowly back away and do not run.
* If the bear does not leave, move to a secure area such as a vehicle or a building.
* Families who live in areas frequented by black bears should have a “Bear Plan” in place for children, with an escape route and planned use of whistles and air horns.
* Black bear attacks on humans are extremely rare. If a black bear does attack, fight back.
DEP wildlife experts emphasize that a black bear simply passing through an area and not causing a specific problem, such as breaking into trash or otherwise trying to access food sources on people’s properties or posing a safety threat, should be left alone.
People should leave the area and allow the bear to continue on its way. When frightened, bears may seek refuge by climbing trees. If the bear does go up a tree, clear the area and give the bear time to climb down and escape.
Report bear damage, nuisance behavior or aggressive bears to the Wildlife Control Unit of the DEP’s Division of Fish and Wildlife at (908) 735-8793. During evenings and weekends, residents should call the local police department or the DEP Hotline at 877-WARN-DEP (877-927-6337)
To learn more about New Jersey’s black bears, visit www.njfishandwildlife.com/bearfacts.htm.

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Black Bear was Captured on Doremus Avenue, Glen Rock, Sunday

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photos courtesy of Boyd Loving’s Facebook Page

May 21,2018

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Glen Rock NJ, A 164 pound male, black bear was captured in the rear yard of 545 Doremus Avenue, Glen Rock, on Sunday afternoon, 05/20. NJDEP Fish & Wildlife Division employees were assisted by Glen Rock PD and Tyco Animal Control Services. No injuries were reported during the capture. The bear had been perched in a tree for several hours following a chase by Glen Rock Police officers after it was initially spotted walking along Lincoln Avenue, Glen Rock. The bear was lured into the NJDEP owned trap by a bag of donuts and some molasses. He was tranquilized prior to being tagged, tattooed, and loaded into a pickup truck for transport to a NJDEP managed forest area.

Glen Rock Police thanked TYCO and the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife, “the bear that was found in a tree in the rear yard of a Doremus Avenue residence today was tranquilized and transported to a safe environment in Western New Jersey.”

Ridgewood Deputy Mayor Mike Sedon was not available for comment .

 

 

 

 

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Bear Sighting in Glen Rock

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December 13,2016

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Glen Rock NJ,  Bear was sighted in the area of Diamond Brook/lower Doremus Avenue around 11am. It did not appear aggressive to the person that reported it to the police. Police checked the entire area, and was unable to locate the animal. All schools were notified. If anymore sighting, please call the police immediately to report its location.

Glen Rock Police Department
1 Harding Plaza
Glen Rock, NJ 07452

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Ramapo State Forest closed for second week after reports of aggressive bear

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Ramapo State Forest closed for second week after reports of aggressive bear

OCTOBER 13, 2015, 8:04 PM    LAST UPDATED: TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2015, 8:06 PM
BY JAMES M. O’NEILL
STAFF WRITER |
THE RECORD

The state has decided to keep Ramapo Mountain State Forest closed for a second consecutive week in what officials are calling an abundance of caution after a series of encounters between hikers and an aggressive bear in recent weeks.

Traps remain in place throughout the park that the state Department of Environmental Protection set to immobilize bears. One of those traps captured a black bear on Oct. 5, which the DEP then killed.

“We don’t know if it’s the right bear,” said DEP spokesman Bob Considine. “We do know that we had three accounts of a potentially aggressive bear following three different sets of hikers in two weeks and the bear that was caught was acting aggressively after the capture.”

https://www.northjersey.com/news/ramapo-state-forest-closed-for-second-week-after-reports-of-aggressive-bear-1.1431521

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Officials approve expanded N.J. bear hunt, report says

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Councilman Sendon could not be reached for comment

The state Fish and Game Council Tuesday voted to expand the bear-hunting season, a controversial decision that wildlife officials say is nonetheless warranted to control populations in a state home to some of the largest concentrations of the animals in the country. (Paul Milo, NJ.com) https://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2015/08/dep_approves_expanded_bear_hunt_report_says.html#incart_river

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Ridgewood Bear Sighting !

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Bear Sighting

May 24, 2015
Dear E-Notice Residents,

The Ridgewood Police Department (RPD) has chased a bear up a tree on Highland Avenue. RPD is working with the NJ Department of Fish and Wildlife to handle this situation appropriately.

The current approach is to continue to station officers with the bear until nighttime when we will wait for the bear to descend from the tree. We have decided to wait until nighttime as the area is abuzz with barbecues and activity and do not want this to be disrupted. We will have an RPD unit monitor the bear’s location as best as possible going forward.

To resolve this incident, the most important thing residents in the area can do is not to have garbage out (this bear was in our community to eat) and to take bird feeders in.

Going forward as a community we need collectively to take measures to discourage bears from wandering into Ridgewood. It is really imperative that garbage is secured – rifling through the garbage to find food is the primary reason that bears come into residential neighborhoods. The existence of bird feeders is also a problem and attracts wildlife such as bears. More information on bears and what residents can do can be found at the NJ Department of Fish and Wildlife’s website – www.njfishandwildlife.com.

Best regards,

Roberta Sonenfeld

Village Manager

201-670-5500, ext. 203

-PLEASE SHARE THIS INFORMATION WITH YOUR NEIGHBORS-