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New Lithium Battery Charges Faster and Last Longer

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, Researchers at Harvard John A. Paulson SEAS have developed a new lithium metal battery that can be charged in minutes and lasts at least 6,000 charging cycles. Lithium metal batteries offer far better energy density and much lower weight than their lithium-ion counterparts. The team has a list of other materials that could potentially yield similar performance. The technology has been licensed through a Harvard spinoff company that has scaled it up to build a smartphone-sized pouch cell battery

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Smartphones And Lithium Batteries: A Perfect Match For Extended Usage

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In an increasingly interconnected world, smartphones have become an indispensable part of our daily lives. From communication to entertainment, navigation to productivity, these pocket-sized devices have revolutionized the way we interact with the world around us. At the heart of this digital revolution lies the humble lithium-ion battery, powering our smartphones and enabling us to stay connected and productive for longer periods than ever before. In this article, we will delve into the symbiotic relationship between smartphones and lithium batteries, exploring the evolution of battery technology, their key features, and the impact on user experience and the environment. To learn more about this topic, click here https://goldenmateenergy.com/products/12v-lifepo4-lithium-battery.

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SpaceX Starlink Cell Service in the Offering

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, SpaceX filed an application with the US FCC on December 6 for authorization to equip some of its Starlink satellites with direct-to-cellular hardware. The FCC recently authorized SpaceX to launch 7,500 second-generation Starlink satellites before the end of the decade. If the direct-to-cellular hardware is approved, Starlink will be able to provide voice, messaging, and basic web browsing capabilities to mobile devices. SpaceX plans to offer smartphone coverage as soon as 2024.

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Police offer Useful Safety tips, taken directly from actual thieves

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file photo courtesy of Paramus Police

WARNING:  Here are some very useful tips… information taken directly from actual thieves who make their living knowing these and many other tricks of the trade. Make note of them and please share with others.

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, here are some very useful safety tips, the information twas taken directly from actual thieves who make their living knowing these and many other tricks of the trade.

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Amazing Black Friday Deals at Best Buy

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Paramus NJ , Best Buy offers some amazing Black Friday deals and is the go to place for all your electronic needs. The  knowledgeable sales staff has been extremely helpful .There is no longer a need to wait for the faithful day after Thanksgiving and rush out to a store location and stand breathlessly in line to take advantage of the deal of the day. Over the years I have snagged many deals particularly with laptops and desktops computers.

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Ridgewood Police: Important Information on Cell Phones and the Do Not Call Registry

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photo by ArtChick

Despite viral email, there is no new cell phone Do Not Call database.

September 28,2017

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, According to the Ridgewood Police department ,consumers may place their cell phone number on the National Do Not Call Registry to notify marketers that they don’t want to get unsolicited telemarketing calls.

The truth about cell phones and the Do Not Call Registry is:
The government is not releasing cell phone numbers to telemarketers.
There is no deadline for registering a cell phone number on the Do Not Call Registry.
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regulations prohibit telemarketers from using automated dialers to call cell phone numbers without prior consent. Automated dialers are standard in the industry, so most telemarketers are barred from calling consumers’ cell phones without their consent.
There is only one Do Not Call Registry, operated by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), with information available at donotcall.gov. There is no separate registry for cell phones.
The Do Not Call Registry accepts registrations from both cell phones and land lines. To register by telephone, call 1-888-382-1222 (TTY: 1-866-290-4236). You must call from the phone number that you want to register. To register online (donotcall.gov), you will have to respond to a confirmation email.
If you have registered a mobile or other telephone number already, you don’t need to re-register. Once registered, a telephone number stays on the Do Not Call Registry until the registration is canceled or service for the number is discontinued.

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February is National Cancer Prevention Month

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February 8,2017

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, February is National Cancer Prevention Month. Take a moment to dispel some cancer myths and misconceptions by sharing this fact sheet from the National Cancer Institute.

Common Cancer Myths and Misconceptions

Certain popular ideas about how cancer starts and spreads—though scientifically wrong—can seem to make sense, especially when those ideas are rooted in old theories. But wrong ideas about cancer can lead to needless worry and even hinder good prevention and treatment decisions. This page provides the latest science-based information about some common cancer myths and misconceptions.

Is cancer a death sentence?

In the United States, the likelihood of dying from cancer has dropped steadily since the 1990s. Five-year survival rates for some cancers, such as breast, prostate, and thyroid cancers, now exceed 90 percent. The 5-year survival rate for all cancers combined is currently about 66 percent. For more information, see the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer.

It is important to note, however, that these rates are based on data from large numbers of people. How long an individual cancer patient will live and whether he or she will die from the disease depend on many factors, including whether the cancer is slow or fast growing, how much the cancer has spread in the body, whether effective treatments are available, the person’s overall health, and more.

Will eating sugar make my cancer worse?

No. Although research has shown that cancer cells consume more sugar (glucose) than normal cells, no studies have shown that eating sugar will make your cancer worse or that, if you stop eating sugar, your cancer will shrink or disappear. However, a high-sugar diet may contribute to excess weight gain, and obesity is associated with an increased risk of developing several types of cancer. For more information, see the NCI fact sheet on Obesity and Cancer.

Do artificial sweeteners cause cancer?

No. Researchers have conducted studies on the safety of the artificial sweeteners (sugar substitutes) saccharin (Sweet ‘N Low®, Sweet Twin®, NectaSweet®); cyclamate; aspartame (Equal®, NutraSweet®); acesulfame potassium (Sunett®, Sweet One®); sucralose (Splenda®); and neotame and found no evidence that they cause cancer in humans. All of these artificial sweeteners except for cyclamate have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for sale in the United States. For more information, see the NCI fact sheet on Artificial Sweeteners and Cancer.

Is cancer contagious?

In general, no. Cancer is not a contagious disease that easily spreads from person to person. The only situation in which cancer can spread from one person to another is in the case of organ or tissue transplantation. A person who receives an organ or tissue from a donor who had cancer in the past may be at increased risk of developing a transplant-related cancer in the future. However, that risk is extremely low—about two cases of cancer per 10,000 organ transplants. Doctors avoid the use of organs or tissue from donors who have a history of cancer.

In some people, cancers may be caused by certain viruses (some types of human papillomavirus, or HPV, for example) and bacteria (such as Helicobacter pylori). While a virus or bacterium can spread from person to person, the cancers they sometimes cause cannot spread from person to person. For more information about cancer-causing viruses and bacteria, see the NCI fact sheets on Helicobacter pylori and Cancer, HPV and Cancer, and Cancer Vaccines.

Does my attitude—positive or negative—determine my risk of, or likely recovery from, cancer?

To date, there is no convincing scientific evidence that links a person’s “attitude” to his or her risk of developing or dying from cancer. If you have cancer, it’s normal to feel sad, angry, or discouraged sometimes and positive or upbeat at other times. People with a positive attitude may be more likely to maintain social connections and stay active, and physical activity and emotional support may help you cope with your cancer. For more information, see the NCI fact sheet on Psychological Stress and Cancer.

Can cancer surgery or a tumor biopsy cause cancer to spread in the body?

The chance that surgery will cause cancer to spread to other parts of the body is extremely low. Following standard procedures, surgeons use special methods and take many steps to prevent cancer cells from spreading during biopsies or surgery to remove tumors. For example, if they must remove tissue from more than one area of the body, they use different surgical tools for each area. For information about how cancer spreads in the body, see our page on Metastatic Cancer.

Will cancer get worse if exposed to air?

No. Exposure to air will not make tumors grow faster or cause cancer to spread to other parts of the body. For information about how cancer spreads in the body, see our page on Metastatic Cancer.

Do cell phones cause cancer?

No, not according to the best studies completed so far. Cancer is caused by genetic mutations, and cell phones emit a type of low-frequency energy that does not damage genes. For more information, see the NCI fact sheet on Cell Phones and Cancer Risk.

Do power lines cause cancer?

No, not according to the best studies completed so far. Power lines emit both electric and magnetic energy. The electric energy emitted by power lines is easily shielded or weakened by walls and other objects. The magnetic energy emitted by power lines is a low-frequency form of radiation that does not damage genes. For more information, see the NCI fact sheet on Electromagnetic Fields and Cancer.

Are there herbal products that can cure cancer?

No. Although some studies suggest that alternative or complementary therapies, including some herbs, may help patients cope with the side effects of cancer treatment, no herbal products have been shown to be effective for treating cancer. In fact, some herbal products may be harmful when taken during chemotherapy or radiation therapy because they may interfere with how these treatments work. Cancer patients should talk with their doctor about any complementary and alternative medicine products—including vitamins and herbal supplements—they may be using. For more information, see the Botanicals/Herbal Products section in Topics in Integrative, Alternative, and Complementary Therapies.

If someone in my family has cancer, am I likely to get cancer, too?

Not necessarily. Cancer is caused by harmful changes (mutations) in genes. Only about 5 to 10 percent of cancers are caused by harmful mutations that are inherited from a person’s parents. In families with an inherited cancer-causing mutation, multiple family members will often develop the same type of cancer. These cancers are called “familial” or “hereditary” cancers.

The remaining 90 to 95 percent of cancers are caused by mutations that happen during a person’s lifetime as a natural result of aging and exposure to environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke and radiation. These cancers are called “non-hereditary” or “spontaneous” cancers. For more information about the risk of getting cancer, see the NCI fact sheet on Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer Syndromes and Cancer Causes and Risk Factors.

If no one in my family has had cancer, does that mean I’m risk-free?

No. Based on the most recent data, about 40 percent of men and women will be diagnosed with cancer at some point during their lives. Most cancers are caused by genetic changes that occur throughout a person’s lifetime as a natural result of aging and exposure to environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke and radiation. Other factors, such as what kind of food you eat, how much you eat, and whether you exercise, may also influence your risk of developing cancer. For more information, see Cancer Causes and Risk Factors.

Do antiperspirants or deodorants cause breast cancer?

No. The best studies so far have found no evidence linking the chemicals typically found in antiperspirants and deodorants with changes in breast tissue. For more information, see the NCI fact sheet on Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer.

Does hair dye use increase the risk of cancer?

There is no convincing scientific evidence that personal hair dye use increases the risk of cancer. Some studies suggest, however, that hairdressers and barbers who are regularly exposed to large quantities of hair dye and other chemical products may have an increased risk of bladder cancer. For more information, see the NCI fact sheet on Hair Dyes and Cancer Risk.

the website of the National Cancer Institute (https://www.cancer.gov)

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Is Political Correctness Hampering the Ramsey Police Investigation of a String of Robberies Targeting Cell Phones and Tablets

Ramsey Police Report a String of Robberies Targeting Cell Phones  and Tablets

Quiz time: What information might the authorities have passed on to the general public about the appearance of the assailants, but mysteriously did not?

Absolutely absurd that these suspects are not being profiled properly. Take a lesson from the wyckoff chief and maybe we can protect ourselfs from these criminals.

What futher description Age Race hair color what is medium build ?.height etc

These guys are maniacs and need to be caught.pistol whipping people needs a serious police reaction ..before these crimes are copied..

“Remain vigilant and report any sort of suspicious activity” says the police chief.

What he’s asking you to do, in his own diplomatic way, is to drop dime on anybody who subjectively looks to you, the bona fide neighborhood resident, like they are out of place and might be up to no good. Unlike the average patrolman, there are no career-ending consequences for an ordinary resident to defy PC orthodoxy and shine the floodlamp of municipal authority on a potential perp. For all of our sakes, don’t go wobbly when something just doesn’t quite look right to you, but you can’t easily explain why. Your telephone call opens the door for the police to roll up on that person and chat them up without any further cause or reason, even if, had you never called, the police themselves, applying their own department guidelines or criteria (read: straightjacket), would have refrained from stopping and talking to the person in question.

In other words, do us all a favor and don’t let fear of how you’ll later be perceived affect the decision of whether or not to call the police.

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U.S. Cellphone Study Fans Cancer Worries

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Researchers found incidences of tumor in rats exposed to low-level radio waves, reigniting debate over safety

By
RYAN KNUTSON
Updated May 28, 2016 11:51 a.m. ET

For almost as long as people have had cellphones, scientists have been debating whether the now-ubiquitous devices cause health effects.

More than a decade ago, the U.S. government set in motion a study to help answer the question. Its initial findings were released this week. The researchers said the findings were significant enough that they felt the urgency to release the results before the entire study was complete.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-cellphone-study-fans-cancer-worries-1464393051

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Think the Supreme Court protected your cellphone from warrantless searches? Think again.

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Think the Supreme Court protected your cellphone from warrantless searches? Think again.

By Brian Fung July 30

It was supposed to be a simple day trip to Niagara Falls. Little did he know the visit might land him in prison for the next 100 years.

Ali Saboonchi was returning from the Canadian side of the falls with his wife in 2012 when he was detained by customs agents at the U.S. border. The agents eventually let the Maryland man go, but not before seizing his electronic devices: an iPhone, an Android phone and a USB flash drive.

At a special facility in Baltimore nearly 400 miles away, officers from Immigration and Customs Enforcement made a copy of the drives and performed what a judge later called an invasive forensic search using “specialized software.”

In the devices’ storage was what U.S. officials say is evidence of a plot to violate U.S.-Iranian trade restrictions, according to federal court documents. Now Saboonchi, who was allegedly involved in the plot, faces four counts of illegal export and one count of conspiracy.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-switch/wp/2014/07/30/think-the-supreme-court-protected-your-cellphone-from-warrantless-searches-think-again/

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Supreme Court bans warrantless cell phone searches, updates privacy laws

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Supreme Court bans warrantless cell phone searches, updates privacy laws

Major ruling updates privacy laws for 21st century

The Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that police must obtain warrants before snooping through people’s cellphones, delivering a unanimous decision that begins to update legal understanding of privacy rules to accommodate 21st-century technology.

Police agencies argued that searching through data on cellphones was no different from asking someone to turn out his pockets, but the justices rejected that, saying a cellphone holds the most personal and intimate details of someone’s life and falls squarely within the Fourth Amendment’s privacy protections.

“The fact that technology now allows an individual to carry such information in his hand does not make the information any less worthy of the protection for which the Founders fought,” Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote in the unanimous opinion. “Our answer to the question of what police must do before searching a cell phone seized incident to an arrest is accordingly simple — get a warrant.”

Read more: https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/jun/25/supreme-court-bans-warrantless-cell-phone-searches/#ixzz35ju4i9um