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>Students for a Democratic Society at Montclair State are hosting former domestic terrorist Bill Ayers

>Students for a Democratic Society at Montclair State are hosting former domestic terrorist Bill Ayers

Bill Ayers on Education &; The New Activism , Thursday, March 24th 2011, 8:15 pm – 10:30 pm at the University Hall, Room: 1030. The event Sponsored By: Students for a Democratic Society.

“Ayers named one of his three children after Zayd Shakur (Tupac’s uncle), the Black Panther who was killed during the infamous JoAnne Chesimard (aka Assata Shakur) shootout on the NJ Turnpike that killed State Trooper Werner Foerster and wounded State Trooper James Harper.”

https://libertychick.com/2011/03/21/unrepentant-terrorist-bill-ayers-to-speak-at-nj-university-on-education-the-new-activism

In June 1969, the Weatherman took control of the SDS at its national convention, where Ayers was elected Education Secretary. Later in 1969, Ayers participated in planting a bomb at a statue dedicated to police casualties in the 1886 Haymarket affair confrontation between labor supporters and the Chicago police.


Ayers participated in the Days of Rage riot in Chicago in October 1969, and in December was at the “War Council” meeting in Flint,Michigan. Two major decisions came out of the “War Council.” The first was to immediately begin a violent, armed struggle (e.g., bombings and armed robberies) against the state without attempting to organize or mobilize a broad swath of the public. The second was to create underground collectives in major cities throughout the country. Larry Grathwohl, a Federal Bureau of Investigation informant in the Weatherman group from the fall of 1969 to the spring of 1970, stated that “Ayers, along with Bernardine Dohrn, probably had the most authority within the Weatherman”.

In an interview published in 1995, Ayers characterized his political beliefs at that time and in the 1960s and 1970s: “I am a radical, Leftist, small ‘c’ communist … [Laughs] Maybe I’m the last communist who is willing to admit it. [Laughs] We have always been small ‘c’ communists in the sense that we were never in the Communist party and never Stalinists. The ethics of communism still appeal to me. I don’t like Lenin as much as the early Marx. 

Ayers was asked in a January 2004 interview, “How do you feel about what you did? Would you do it again under similar circumstances?” He replied: “I’ve thought about this a lot. Being almost 60, it’s impossible to not have lots and lots of regrets about lots and lots of things, but the question of did we do something that was horrendous, awful? … I don’t think so. I think what we did was to respond to a situation that was unconscionable.” 


In an op-ed piece in 2008, Ayers gave this assessment of his actions:The Weather Underground crossed lines of legality, of propriety and perhaps even of common sense. Our effectiveness can be — and still is being — debated. He also reiterated his rebuttal to the charge of terrorism: The Weather Underground went on to take responsibility for placing several small bombs in empty offices…. We did carry out symbolic acts of extreme vandalism directed at monuments to war and racism, and the attacks on property, never on people, were meant to respect human life and convey outrage and determination to end the Vietnam war.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Ayers

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