Posted on

TONIGHT: Ridgewood Budget Vote for the 2024-2025 School Year of $138.5 MILLION

IMG 5358 scaled

file photo

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, the Monday, April 29, 2024 Ridgewood Board of Education Meeting includes a resolution for the adoption of the 2024-2025 Final Budget for Ridgewood Public Schools.

The attached budget information was mailed to all Ridgewood residents the week of April 22, 2024. For additional details on the 2024-2025 budget, including the advertised budget, please visit the RPS website.

Note: the attached document and the website reflect corrected text at the bottom of page 1: “222 Total AP Scholars”.

Digital – 2024-25 Budget Mailerrev.pdf

 

 

I love Wing Bikes. Use my referral link to get a discount now! http://wingbikes.refr.cc/jamesfoytlin?t=tw

24 thoughts on “TONIGHT: Ridgewood Budget Vote for the 2024-2025 School Year of $138.5 MILLION

  1. WOW!

    3
    1
    1. We didn’t even make the list of top schools

      3
      1
      1. …but we are among the top schools whose students know their pronouns.

        1. If that’s a problem, it’s a failure of the concerned parents who are neither willing or capable of exerting proper influence over their own progeny.

  2. Get ready to dig deeper into your wallet.

    3
    1
  3. This is just out of control.
    Remember the current president Sheila Brogan is a Union Candidate and she’s using this budget to give back to the union!!

    2
    6
  4. $carf Lady strikes again !

    2
    5
  5. No complaints from residents who voted to kill the opportunity to vote on school budgets. That charge was led by Winograd.

    1
    1
  6. There is so much turnover with the administration at cottage place no wonder it’s out of control. Who is in charge of the budget I thought the BA I guess as soon as it implodes they leave to another district. They need someone in there that knows what they’re doing

    1
    1
  7. Great headline, but let’s at least acknowledge that it is under the 2% cap. So on that one, job well done.

    What suprises me is that total enrollment is actually down 4.3% from 2018. So in effect, the 2% isn’t really 2% if you do it on a per pupil basis. So on that one, not so great.

    And finally, for everyone who said that the density housing would crush the school system with an overload of students…guess again. But at least we have more police and fire wages and benefits to pay.

    1
    2
    1. I think there are other issues with Public Education that are driving people to seek alternatives

      3
      1
      1. Yep like a horrible college process at RHS

  8. On one hand, I want our schools to be amazing but on the other hand, I hope that our board members are careful with taxpayer dollars. From the meetings I have attended or watched on line, I get the impression that Kwak and Dani are the ones paying attention to spending.

    4
    2
    1. When will you stop humping for the these 2..?

      1. Like the man said they are the only two on the BOE that know how to add

        2
        3
  9. The physical contact between RHS Principal Jeff Nyhuis and retiree Nancy Reilly that took place during Monday night’s BOE meeting was totally inappropriate. Is touching between administration and staff members at RHS a regular occurrence? Condoned by the BOE? I smell a huge lawsuit in the making.

    1
    6
  10. They’re being stingy with respect to security. A mere $60k, four (4) thousandths of a percent of a $138.5 million budget, could get them an additional police officer.

  11. They’re being stingy with security so they can pay themselves. Take a look at some of the salaries. HUGE budget and not even in the top ten schools. They hire consultants to do the work they can’t seem to Seriously where is this money going

    2
    1
  12. In the Board of Ed agendas over the past 18 months, there are many teachers moving to 1.2 FTE salaries. In this past agenda, I believe I even saw a teacher move to a 1.4 FTE. Can someone explain this? It boosted individual salaries in some cases 20%. Sort of looks like every teacher getting big raise over past year. Perhaps legitimate, I just want to understand better what is happening.

    1
    1
    1. Actually a 1.2 or 1.4 FTE saves the district money by not having to provide benefits to another employee and not being overstaffed as the need for those classes ebb and flow with enrollment.

    2. They are teachers covering extra classes because the schools can’t get leave replacements. The extra money is not pensionable, meaning it does not increase the teacher’s pension when they retire.

  13. That’s one big budget, holy shit how much are the taxes going to be now? What is the average person paying in taxes because I’m looking at houses in town little Cape Cod what they’re going for is ridiculous. Why would you wanna live in Ridgewood when you go to a better town, like Wyckoff. Holy shit.

    3
    1
    1. Wyckoff, lol!

  14. College placement is one of the most objective measures of how well our district is educating its students (and what we, as taxpayers, are “buying” for our money). Here is the data:

    https://cdnsm5-ss10.sharpschool.com/UserFiles/Servers/Server_208888/Image/Our%20School/Guidance/PROFILE_2023.pdf

    Stanford: 1
    Harvard: 0
    MIT: 0
    Yale: 0
    Dartmouth: 0
    Brown: 1
    Columbia: 1
    U Penn: 0
    Cornell: 5
    Princeton: 1

    Tenalfly High School (which is similar to Ridgewood socioeconomically) gets arguably better performance (and at a lower tax rate):

    https://resources.finalsite.net/images/v1697636411/tenaflyschoolsorg/eesxzznxhffwlbnginbo/BoardPresentation-Classof2023.pdf

    Naturally, there are many factors at play here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *