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Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi to Hold Town Hall on Court Forced Overdevelopment in Bergen County

CBD high density housing

May 25,2017

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Paramus NJ, Under recent affordable housing rulings by the NJ Supreme Court, our communities are being forced to permit construction of up to  1.5 MILLION new units of unneeded housing in order to satisfy a fictitious population increase of 30 percent in the next 9 years.

Protect our State from ridiculous affordable housing court mandates (which may result in over 1.5 MILLION new units of housing in NJ) by supporting A-4666 and A-4667 to stop the Court actions and study the issue while we still can.

Many of our NJ residents are unaware that their communities will be forced to DOUBLE their housing population in just the next 9 years, destroying all existing housing prices.

Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi  is now asking of volunteers. “I’m going to need all volunteers willing to help. I’ve received permission to host a “town hall” session on June 15th at 5:30 at Bergen Community College in Paramus. If the NJ Legislature won’t hold meetings on housing affordability and court forced overdevelopment, I will. The intent of this meeting is to host an open hearing to gain thoughts, concerns and options from members of the public, Mayors and Councils, planners, engineers, traffic experts, board of education members, environmental groups, etc. I will personally pay for transcripts of this hearing and will have them delivered to the Legislature. This will be the first of numerous hearings held throughout the entire State. I will draft a formal letter tomorrow for distribution throughout the County. Anyone willing to help out in the circulation efforts would be greatly appreciated. If you have an hour or two to spare please call my office (201) 666-0881 and ask for Doreen.”

https://theridgewoodblog.net/assemblywomen-holly-schepisi-continues-to-push-for-a-sensible-housing-policy-for-bergen-county/

https://theridgewoodblog.net/assemblywoman-holly-schepisi-nj-supreme-court-is-forcing-our-communities-to-build-up-to-one-million-new-units-of-unneeded-housing/

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Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi NJ Supreme Court is forcing our communities to build up to ONE MILLION new units of unneeded housing

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March 25,2017
Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi

Under recent affordable housing rulings by the NJ Supreme Court, our communities are being forced to permit construction of up to ONE MILLION new units of unneeded housing in order to satisfy a fictitious population increase of 30 percent in the next 9 years. Today’s Bergen Record reports that NOBODY COMES HERE. IT’S TOO CROWDED (the story is below). So why is all this housing being forced on New Jersey? Help me stop this while we still can. Please write Assembly Speaker Prieto asmprieto@njleg.org and ask him to post A-4666 which imposes a moratorium on affordable housing settlements and litigation and A-4667 which creates a commission to study the actual need and obligations.

– “New Jersey population continues growing by slim margins,” by The Record’s Dave Sheingold: “New Jersey’s population inched up by the barest of margins last year, continuing a nearly three-decade trend that has seen the state grow at one of the slowest rates in the country, according to data released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. Lodged firmly in a pattern seen across most of the northeast and parts of the Midwest since before the turn of the century, the number of New Jerseyans increased by a mere 9,000, or 0.1 percent, in 2016. That left the nation’s most densely populated state with 8.94 million residents, a figure that is up 1.7 percent since 2010 and 6.3 percent since 2000. New Jersey’s growth rate this decade is the 14th smallest in the country, far behind increases of 6 to 12 percent seen in the southeast, southwest, west and northern Great Plains.”

https://www.northjersey.com/…/new-jersey-populatio…/99531254/

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NJTPC Presents Special Guest Speaker Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi

Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi

Special Guest Speaker Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi
March 21 – 7pm
650 American Legion Drive, Teaneck N J

(Don’t forget to bring a pantry item for the American Legion food drive-support our veterans’ good works)

Teaneck N J , We are very fortunate to have Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi as our guest speaker on March 21, Tuesday.  Assemblywoman Schepisi has been an advocate for towns deciding what happens in their own town….wouldn’t you think that is the right way forum for these decisions to be made?

Don’t think for a moment this isn’t going to affect your town or any town in NJ for that matter….we brought this issue to your attention last year and now it’s rearing it’s ugly head in full force on the state level.

In a decision that could reshape hundreds of communities, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled in January that municipalities must allow the development of affordable housing for poor and middle-class families whose needs were ignored for more than 16 years.

A recent article in NorthJersey.com highlighted Affordable Housing affecting the towns in Bergen County.

“Two Pascack Valley towns have thrown their support behind legislation that aims to bring affordable-housing litigation in the state to a screeching halt and pressure the state Legislature to take action on the issue.  The governing bodies in Emerson and Woodcliff Lake approved resolutions last week backing the bills, which were introduced by Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi.

One bill – A4666 – urges a freeze on all affordable-housing litigation through the end of the year.   A companion bill – A4667 – calls for establishing a bipartisan Affordable Housing Obligation Study Commission that would be composed of professionals and elected officials to determine each town’s affordable-housing obligations.
State Sen. Gerald Cardinale, R-Demarest, has sponsored similar legislation in the Senate.

Towns have been submitting their housing plans to state judges for approval, after the state Supreme Court ordered them to bypass the Council on Affordable Housing, which has been inactive for years because of bureaucratic dysfunction.

Schepisi said the Legislature should be dealing with the issue, not the courts. “There are a host of out-of-the-box ideas and thinking that we as legislators should be exploring, and we’re not,” Schepisi said, adding: “We need to also question if the obligation should rest with the state rather than each municipality.”

https://www.northjersey.com/story/news/bergen/2017/03/10/pascack-valley-towns-support-affordable-housing-bills/98905412/

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Time for the Ridgewood Mayor and Village Council to support Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi’s legislation which imposes a moratorium on all affordable housing litigation

houseing_projects_theridgewoodblog

March 12,2017
the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, is it time for the Mayor and Village Council to step up and support Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi’s legislation , bill (A4666) which imposes a moratorium on all affordable housing litigation until the end of the year.

Please get your local Mayors and Councils to support these bills and call your legislators to co-sponsor them.

“The problem with this particular issue is that if people wait too long, there’s no way to reverse it,” said Schepisi. “I don’t think people know how critical of a timing issue this is for so many of the residents we represent and the municipalities we represent.”

As towns near the end of their court-granted immunity from builders’ remedy lawsuits, many are beginning to settle their affordable housing obligations.

“Municipalities, their mayors and councils, are feeling tremendous pressure to enter into settlement agreements which may not benefit their communities in any sort of fashion because they literally feel as though they have a gun to their heads,” Schepisi said.

https://www.northjersey.com/story/news/bergen/2017/03/10/pascack-valley-towns-support-affordable-housing-bills/98905412/

Schepisi proposes putting the brakes on litigation while Legislature addresses affordable housing crisis.
https://theridgewoodblog.net/schepisi-proposes-putting-the-brakes-on-litigation-while-legislature-addresses-affordable-housing-crisis/
Trenton, N.J. – New Jersey municipalities could get relief from building more than 200,000 low income housing units and 1,000,000 total new housing units under a bill introduced by Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi on Tuesday. The bill (A4666) imposes a moratorium on all affordable housing litigation until the end of the year.

“If we wait any longer the transformative impact on our communities will not be reversible,” said Schepisi (R-Bergen). “Now is the time for the Legislature to act.”

Municipalities have spent millions of taxpayer dollars over the years fighting affordable housing mandates in court. After a January NJ Supreme Court ruling forced towns to consider past housing needs for the first time, municipalities statewide are struggling to compensate. The far-reaching mandate increases low-income housing need by 142 percent while forcing municipalities to permit building that would accommodate a phantom 30 percent population increase.

“The court’s social engineering will devastate all 23 municipalities I represent and suburban municipalities throughout the entire state,” said Schepisi. “The legislature needs to stop ignoring affordable housing and instead should immediately act to fix this problem in a responsible manner. While we focus our energies to vote on the State bird and State butterfly our communities are being turned into mini Brooklyns. We cannot let the court legislate what is best for individual communities. This isn’t temporary; this is forever. I am circulating a resolution to every Mayor and Council in the State seeking their support for an immediate legislative solution.”

Schepisi also introduced a companion bill (A-4667) creating a short term commission that will study prior court decisions, the effectiveness of past affordable housing practices, and analyze projected population increases and corresponding housing need. The commission will hold public hearings and is required to publish a report of its findings at the end of the year.

The January court mandate would unnecessarily increase housing supply by as much as 30 percent in the next 9 years anticipating a population growth of 2.73 million. If built, the number of new housing units in New Jersey would exceed housing numbers for the entire city of Manhattan. These projections would cost New Jersey taxpayers over $11.75 billion more in education alone. On the flip side, Rutger’s economists project a population increase of only .3 percent, or 219,000 people, per year until 2026.

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Schepisi proposes putting the brakes on litigation while Legislature addresses affordable housing crisis.

Projects theridgewoodblog.net

March 3,2017

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Trenton, N.J. – New Jersey municipalities could get relief from building more than 200,000 low income housing units and 1,000,000 total new housing units under a bill introduced by Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi on Tuesday. The bill (A4666) imposes a moratorium on all affordable housing litigation until the end of the year.

“If we wait any longer the transformative impact on our communities will not be reversible,” said Schepisi (R-Bergen). “Now is the time for the Legislature to act.”

Municipalities have spent millions of taxpayer dollars over the years fighting affordable housing mandates in court. After a January NJ Supreme Court ruling forced towns to consider past housing needs for the first time, municipalities statewide are struggling to compensate. The far-reaching mandate increases low-income housing need by 142 percent while forcing municipalities to permit building that would accommodate a phantom 30 percent population increase.

“The court’s social engineering will devastate all 23 municipalities I represent and suburban municipalities throughout the entire state,” said Schepisi. “The legislature needs to stop ignoring affordable housing and instead should immediately act to fix this problem in a responsible manner. While we focus our energies to vote on the State bird and State butterfly our communities are being turned into mini Brooklyns. We cannot let the court legislate what is best for individual communities. This isn’t temporary; this is forever. I am circulating a resolution to every Mayor and Council in the State seeking their support for an immediate legislative solution.”

Schepisi also introduced a companion bill (A-4667) creating a short term commission that will study prior court decisions, the effectiveness of past affordable housing practices, and analyze projected population increases and corresponding housing need. The commission will hold public hearings and is required to publish a report of its findings at the end of the year.

The January court mandate would unnecessarily increase housing supply by as much as 30 percent in the next 9 years anticipating a population growth of 2.73 million. These projections would cost New Jersey taxpayers over $11.75 billion more in education alone. On the flip side, Rutger’s economists project a population increase of only .3 percent, or 219,000 people, per year until 2026

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Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi calls for legislative fix to Supreme Court rules on affordable housing

Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi

January 21,2017

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Westwood NJ,  Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi released the following statement on the state Supreme Court decision requiring municipalities to provide affordable housing for the “gap period:”

“I am deeply disappointed in the Supreme Court’s decision to enforce a gap-period. This ruling will devastate all 23 municipalities I represent and suburban municipalities throughout the state. The failure of the legislature to address the social engineering of the court should not result in changing communities forever.”

“I implore our Senate President and Assembly Speaker to do everything in their power to move forward with bi-partisan legislation addressing this issue. The court rules on what is constitutional, not aggressively ruling what it thinks is best for the state. We cannot let the court legislate what is best for individual communities.”

Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi goes on, “While ideologically I think our communities want to welcome all regardless of income levels the mandates of COAH have implications far beyond that. Many of our communities with populations under 10,000 people are facing the threat of population increases of 10 percent or more without the infrastructure, schools or services to support massive population increases. We currently receive virtually no money from the state to support our schools, our Municipalities, our infrastructure. Mandating massive building in our communities (many of which are done with PILOT agreements) without any financial help to do so will cause a significant financial burden on all. As an example the new 150 unit apartment complex with commercial components will be paying less than $1,750 per average unit per year (in property taxes and payments in lieu of taxes combined) for 30 years with slight increases based upon rental incomes received by the developers. Meanwhile every other home in the Borough is paying an average of about $12,000 per year in property taxes . That $12,000 figure is guaranteed to rise in order to make up for the shortfalls. Further, people have chosen to live in the suburbs for a reason. Prior to moving back to Bergen County I lived many years in cities including Washington, New York and London. I choose where we live today because of the open space, the small class sizes, the fact that there weren’t five or six story buildings around me. Why should the Courts be able to change the entire character of the community I live in?”

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NJ Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi : If you ever wonder where I stand on an issue or why please reach out

Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi

Good morning everyone,

It has come to my attention that a “volunteer” is going door to door with a petition telling residents I do not support equal pay for women. Considering the fact that I am a female who has worked since the age of 14 the concept that I don’t support equal pay is ludicrous at best. I can only assume they are trying to pressure me to support a piece of proposed legislation for which I recently abstained. I abstained because as drafted the legislation would have created unnecessary costly litigation while further hurting New Jersey businesses. In particular the legislation would have retroactively imposed legal standards on companies without ever having given them an opportunity to comply. The result would have been tens of millions in lawyers pockets, not pay equality for women. Indeed I told the sponsors of the bill that if certain modifications were made they would have my support. If you ever wonder where I stand on an issue or why please reach out.

Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi

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The Fairness Formula is the Future of Education Funding

Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi

By Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi

Many people in New Jersey do not understand the archaic formulas which drive state funding for our schools and the vastly different property tax results in our respective municipalities. Under the New Jersey Constitution, it is mandated that students be provided a thorough and efficient education. That phrase has been thrown around conveniently in defense of an inequitable formula that is too expensive to fund with results that scream failure. New Jersey needs a fair funding formula that fixes the problem, and Bergen taxpayers need real property tax relief.

A few weeks ago, Governor Christie proposed a formula that would provide equal funding on a per student basis. This new formula, called the fairness formula, is nearly identical to what I have introduced since 2012. The majority in the legislature wants to continue with a failed system, which has disproportionately and negatively impacted 69 out of 70 communities in Bergen County. What the Governor and I have proposed will fix the problem.

Under the proposed fairness formula, state aid would be $6,599 per pupil with additional funding provided for students with special needs. No student will be regarded as worth more than another. The state has thrown billions of dollars at underperforming districts for years and the situation hasn’t improved. The time is now that we face reality and provide fair funding for every student in the state and stop strangling taxpayers to fund failure.

One of those former Abbott districts is Passaic City. With only around 10,000 public students, it receives more money than all 70 municipalities combined in Bergen, which has approximately 250,000 students. Further, overfunded municipalities often use that money to pay for things other than students, such as Elizabeth which in 2015 spent more per student on legal and consulting fees ($237 per pupil) than on textbooks and supplies.

In comparison, Pascack Valley Regional High School District is rated the eighth best school district in New Jersey with a graduation rate of 98 percent, while receiving only $550 per student (a number only slightly higher than what Elizabeth spent on legal and consulting fees). The average property tax in Bergen County is well over $11,000. As a result of these increasingly high property taxes, Bergen County has found itself in recent years with one of the highest rates of foreclosures, pre-foreclosures and personal bankruptcies. On the flip side, Camden High School has only a 46 percent graduation rate and yet receives over $30,000 per student. The average property tax in Camden County is only slightly over $6,000. Other than a handful of exceptions, towns in Bergen and Passaic counties have carried the brunt of increasing property taxes, yet they have received the least amount of funding in the entire state.

This lopsided school funding formula is indefensible. Bergen and Passaic homeowners are paying sky high property taxes to fund a school district on the opposite side of the state that can’t graduate half of its students. What makes the students in Camden worth sixty-times more than a student who goes to Pascack Valley or any other school district in Bergen or Passaic? What makes 10,000 school age children in Passaic more valuable than every school district in Bergen County combined? The answer: court mandates on how the state should spend its money.

The state Supreme Court ruled in the Abbott v. Burke decisions that most money should be distributed to districts that have demonstrated an inability to provide educational excellence. The consequence has been diverting money from districts that pay through the nose for education to districts that don’t; such as Bergen paying for Camden. Diverting these funds has resulted in higher property taxes for districts that want to maintain the educational excellence they have achieved. In some cases the towns with diverted funds have large retiree populations, robbing senior citizens of their savings and the value of their homes.

The Corzine school funding formula the court approved has resulted in failure. The court ruled that nearly sixty percent of school funding provided to only 5 percent of school districts satisfies a constitutionally thorough and efficient education. This unfair formula has increased property taxes across the state and has failed to effectively educate the students in districts that cost the most taxpayer dollars. All the while, student enrollment in the former Abbott districts has decreased as funding has increased.

When schools are funded on a per pupil basis, taxpayers benefit. School funding will increase nearly 500 percent in Bergen and Passaic with the fairness formula, while average property taxes will be reduced by over $2,000. When schools aren’t funded on a per pupil basis, $5.1 billion goes to 31 districts and $4 billion goes to 546 districts. The fairness formula will equitably spend $9.1 billion across all 577 districts, without any property tax discrimination based on educational excellence. Any legislator representing these counties who does not support this fair and balanced approach is failing to represent their own constituents.

Providing funding equally on a per pupil basis will level out the playing field and decrease property taxes across the state. Extra aid will only be provided to make sure we take care of our special education students who need the extra help to get by. Three out of four school districts in the entire state would see an increase in aid, 69 out of 70 municipalities in Bergen County would see an increase in aid. That means 69 Bergen County towns will see a reduction in property taxes, providing much needed relief.

The current school funding formula has been a disaster that drives up property taxes and does nothing to help failing school districts reverse the course. The fairness formula will provide fair funding. Opponents to the idea will holler that it is unconstitutional. If that is their only concern, I have sponsored a resolution since 2012 (ACR35) amending the constitution to provide a thorough and efficient education on a per pupil basis. The current formula is an indefensible failure, if the constitution is the only concern, then pass my resolution and the fairness formula.

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Schepisi: Casino Revenue Should be Used to ‘Right the Ship’

Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi

Oftentimes we miss opportunities in Trenton. Today New Jersey faces several major economic issues including pension funding and our transportation trust fund which is running out of money. Our only options to make the State fiscally sound are to 1. Increase revenues, 2. Cut spending and/or 3. Raise taxes. We are currently the highest taxed state in the nation and raising taxes is not a smart option. We have the potential to bring in additional revenue through expansion of casino gaming but as currently drafted NONE of that money will be able to be used to stabilize our pension system or to pay for our crumbling infrastructure costs. Instead, the legislature has handcuffed itself and is ensuring that taxes will rise again in the future. What are we doing? Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi

According to Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi, SCR1, a constitutional amendment that would allow casino expansion outside of Atlantic City must be reshaped in order for additional casinos to be a worthwhile addition to New Jersey. Alyana Alfaro, PolitickerNJ Read more

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Lame Duck NJ Redistricting Scheme Raises More Questions than It Answers

Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi

In the days prior to Christmas, two hastily called Judiciary committee hearings were called in an effort to change the NJ State Constitution, ensuring one party control of the State in perpetuity. Practically no notice was provided, no information was shared, no questions were answered and no experts testified. Regardless of your political leanings, anyone who favors open, transparent, good government should reject what transpired. So far the Star Ledger and the Daily Record editorial boards have denounced this political gamesmanship. Below please find an Op Ed piece regarding this issue.

Lame Duck Redistricting Scheme Raises More Questions than It Answers

By Assemblyman Michael Patrick Carroll and Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi

Schemes hatched in lame duck sessions of the Legislature should always give reason for pause, but changing voting rights without considerable public discussion is reckless. A proposed constitutional amendment with a significant but unknown impact on the voting rights of New Jersey’s citizens deserves more than the hasty, slapdash, non-transparent treatment the Democrats are giving this measure.

Ignoring the Legislature’s responsibility to hold fact-finding hearings, Chairman John McKeon dismissed concerns about fast-tracking the proposal changing the way the state redraws its legislative districts. “The people of New Jersey will have the opportunity to vote on whatever is on the ballot,” he said at last week’s Assembly Judiciary Committee hearing.

We did not support this plan in part because the sponsors couldn’t answer basic questions. How can voters make an informed decision about a constitutional amendment when the Legislature itself does not fully understand it?

What’s the rush? Legislative districts won’t be reconfigured again until 2021. When the 1966 Constitutional Convention considered the standards used today, it met for three months and had 14 meetings full of expert testimony. Additionally, there were six meetings specifically on apportionment. In this process, the Democrats are advancing a plan after only two brief committee meetings with no expert testimony and only one member of the public commenting.

Their amendment relies on a decades-old report by Dr. Donald Stokes, who served on the Apportionment Commission in 1981 and 1991. Many of his assumptions are based on demographics from almost a generation ago. No one can deny that New Jersey has changed significantly in a quarter century. Does Stokes’ modeling still hold true? Were the demographics he used in 1993 accurate on what we know today?

The amendment deviates from the report on even more critical aspects. Stokes used legislative elections to create his models and proposal, but this amendment ignores them. Instead, it relies on federal and gubernatorial elections that have little to do with drawing up legislative districts. Why exclude legislative races to determine how those districts should be drawn? That’s like using baseball statistics to figure out how football should be played.

Their plan requires only a quarter of districts to be competitive, but allows the remaining 75 percent to have no contest at all. Why not maximize the number of competitive districts? The Stokes test for determining whether a map is fair requires the popular vote across the state to be represented among the districts as a whole and be responsive to the shifts of public opinion. When electoral tides move strongly toward one party, that party should fairly quickly win an effective majority of seats. Using the 2011 legislative election returns, a fair map should have resulted with 21 Democrat and 19 Republican Senators, rather than the 24-16 split that has remained since that election.

Further, the amendment intentionally excludes the equal representation requirement in the state Constitution. Every state respects equal population requirements, the bedrock of American democracy since “no taxation without representation.” Yet, the Democrats intentionally left it out in favor of gerrymandering districts, which almost always shift groups of voters to limit the voting rights of others. They may point to the compactness requirement in the constitution, but this amendment makes federal law pre-eminent.

Why do the sponsors want to make this change? Democrats have held a legislative majority since 2001 and hold their largest majority in 40 years.

The plan was conceived behind closed-doors by Democratic political operatives with essentially a super PAC in East Brunswick. They introduced it to the Assembly Judiciary Committee on November 17, even though it was not mentioned during a previous meeting just three days earlier. With little more information than a Politico article, it passed on a party-line vote the week before Christmas.

By the end of the next day, the Democrats wanted to limit the number of members on the redistricting commission in their plan without explanation. They called the committee back the following Monday, but that meeting started four hours late after most of the media and public left. This contempt for transparency and lack of serious inquiry into this proposal’s ramifications is striking and should be a matter of serious concern to anyone who values New Jersey’s voting rights.

While parties may disagree on the result of the map every ten years, New Jersey’s electoral process has been routinely praised by academics when compared to other states. Why weren’t those experts invited to the committee hearing? Shouldn’t we know what other states do before moving forward with a constitutional amendment? Surely if this plan were all the Democrats say, there would have been a line of academics ready to back them up.

In no other profession would you first enact a policy to know what is in it. The lack of information, transparency and candor is reason enough to be concerned with where the state is headed under a Democratic majority. This constitutional amendment blindly leads the public into forever changing the way New Jersey votes.

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Mountains to climb: North Jersey lawmaker tells of her road back after brain aneurysm

Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi

“Today the Bergen Record covered the road from my illness through my recovery. I shared my story in part to bring awareness to the public of brain aneurysms. Towards that goal, I am announcing my newest endeavor. I have agreed to join the board of The Lisa Colagrossi Foundation. The newly formed Foundation was started by Todd Crawford who lost his wife Lisa Colagrossi, a popular newscaster, after she suffered a brain aneurysm earlier this year. The Foundation’s focus will be to raise awareness and educate individuals to warning signs and treatment options for brain aneurysms.

The Foundation recently launched the “Lucky 7” challenge. The effort is a one-of-a-kind national fundraising campaign that will directly fund brain aneurysm awareness, education, research and support initiatives across the country. “Lucky 7” encourages individuals and businesses to make donations that include the number 7, Lisa’s favorite number and the network she worked for in New York City.

For more information about The Lisa Colagrossi Foundation, Holly Schepisi’s board announcement, the “Lucky 7” challenge and information about brain aneurysms please visit www.LisasLegacy7.org. “Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi

Mountains to climb: North Jersey lawmaker tells of her road back after brain aneurysm

NOVEMBER 8, 2015    LAST UPDATED: SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2015, 12:59 AM
BY LINDY WASHBURN
STAFF WRITER |
THE RECORD

On a Saturday in March, Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi  felt her left arm go numb. It was cold out, and she’d just given a speech at a rally to oppose oil trains crossing the Oradell Reservoir. Soon she felt like her tongue was swelling. She quietly excused herself.

At home, she felt “as if the synapses in my brain were misfiring,” she said. It was like “someone was pressing Bubble Wrap in my brain.” As she sat with her young son, her left side went numb.

“I felt like I was in the movie ‘The Matrix,’ popping in and out of reality,” she said. She jumped out of her chair. “Something is really wrong,” she told her husband.

https://www.northjersey.com/news/mountains-to-climb-north-jersey-lawmaker-tells-of-her-road-back-after-brain-aneurysm-1.1451094