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350 Unit Development Planed for Anderson Street in Hackensack Near Train Station

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Hackensack NJ, Plans for a substantial apartment building at the intersection of Anderson and Linden streets are progressing, with an additional 30 units proposed for a mixed-use development at the location.

Continue reading 350 Unit Development Planed for Anderson Street in Hackensack Near Train Station

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Paramus Council to Reexamine “Master Plan” in Effort to Preserve Paramus’s Suburban Character

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Paramus NJ, in response to a wave of new development, Paramus is set to revisit its master plan, which serves as a framework for local officials to manage construction and conservation within the town.

Continue reading Paramus Council to Reexamine “Master Plan” in Effort to Preserve Paramus’s Suburban Character

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Trenton Continues to Push a Massive Over-development Scheme Under the Guise of . “Affordable Housing”

high density housing hero

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Trenton NJ, A proposed “Affordable Housing” law aims to establish the required amount of affordable housing for towns to protect against developers bypassing municipal approval processes. The law suggests using a formula outlined in a 2018 court opinion by Judge Mary Jacobson, which initially applied to Princeton and West Windsor. The Department of Community Affairs would calculate the town’s affordable housing number by Dec. 1, 2024, or seven months within the bill’s effective date, avoiding the need for three regional court-appointed special masters, as proposed in the previous session’s draft.

Continue reading Trenton Continues to Push a Massive Over-development Scheme Under the Guise of . “Affordable Housing”

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Franklin Lakes Council Postpones Vote to Rezone Cigna Property for Mixed Use

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Franklin Lakes NJ, the borough postponed a vote to rezone the Cigna property for mixed use until August 15th . The vote was scheduled for action at the Borough Council’s July 6 meeting, but it was postponed that night until at least its July 18 session. Tuesday’s notice on the borough’s “Latest Buzz” website newsletter changed the vote date to Aug. 15.

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Upper Saddle River Residents Protest Construction Practices’ of Oversized Orthodox Jewish Cemetery Development on New York Border

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Upper Saddle River NJ, a two-year simmering dispute over building violations and the size and scale of several Jewish facilities under construction on its northern border has finally generated a public pledge to pursue remedies from the Upper Saddle River Mayor Arman Fardanesh and Upper Saddle River council at Thursday’s meeting.

Continue reading Upper Saddle River Residents Protest Construction Practices’ of Oversized Orthodox Jewish Cemetery Development on New York Border

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Glen Rock Say NO new mixed-used development after Police Chief calls it a “public safety nightmare”

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Glen Rock NJ, a new mixed-used development at 175 Rock Road in Glen Rock was rejected 3-2 by the Glen Rock Planning Board on Friday, with the opposition citing traffic and safety concerns. “As a cop, you go with your gut instinct,” Police Chief Dean Ackermann said, “and my gut instinct is that this will be a public safety nightmare.”

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Village Council looks to Promote Ridgewood’s Tree Canopy : Holding Developers Accountable for the Treescape

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file photo courtesy of Boyd Loving

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, the Village Council is proposing some changes to the Villages shrub and tree ordinance . The stated purpose is that the Council of the Village of Ridgewood is desirous of minimizing the indiscriminate removal and cutting of trees upon lots , parcels and tracks of land within the Village which can result in increased stormwater runoff , soil erosion and decreased groundwater recharge …

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Neighbors Say Not so Fast to Fourteen New Townhomes in River Vale

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

River Vale NJ, neighbors are not happy with a fourteen new townhomes proposal that could be built at Rivervale Road and Collignon Way if an application before the joint Planning Board wins approval in River Vale.

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New Year But Same Old Runoff Problem for Upper Saddle and Saddle River Communities

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photos by Derek Michalski

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Upper Saddle River NJ, A New Year, but the same old problems for Upper Saddle and Saddle River communities. Apparently brown Wonka water is good for home values in one of the richest zip codes in the United States 07458. Of course I am being facetious. All kidding aside have you checked your home value lately?

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Hackensack Voters Say NO to $170 million schools proposal

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Hackensack NJ, Hackensack voters shot down a nearly $170 million schools proposal Tuesday,  forcing school officials to find new ways to address the district’s growing student population and aging facilities. Hackensack voters overwhelmingly rejected the proposal. According to unofficial election results from Tuesday night, early counts show that an estimated 638 voted in favor of the project and 2,225 voted against. The count included absentee ballots.

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Borough of Englewood Cliffs to Hold High Density Housing Hearings

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Dear Residents,

On Wednesday, September 23, 2020, the Borough of Englewood Cliffs emailed to residents the attached Public Notice Regarding 800 Sylvan Avenue LLC, which was advertised in The Bergen Record by the attorneys for 800 Sylvan Avenue LLC. The Public Notice announces the upcoming court hearing on 800 Sylvan Avenue’s Site Plan Application for approval.  The public hearing commences at 10:00 A.M. on Tuesday, September 29, 2020, and continuing each day thereafter until concluded at the Bergen County Superior Courthouse.

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Reader says , “All this development is a result of the High Density Ordinances that passed 3 to 2 during the reign of Paul, Albert and Gwenn”

Ridgewood 3 amigos

“All this development is a result of the High Density Ordinances that passed 3 to 2 during the reign of Paul, Albert and Gwenn. Hundreds of residents came to at least two council meetings to speak against the increase of 12units per acre in the CBD to 35. The garage we have today is a compromise from the giant one these same 3 pushed that would have encroached on Hudson and taken away much street parking. At the same time we were fighting for a less intrusive Valley expansion project which would have been more appropriate for the area which contains two schools,private homes and sits on one of our busiest intersections The main driveway would have allowed cars in increased numbers to exit on to Linwood Avenue. If you have looked at the Valley site on Winters Avenue and the massive construction going on there, you would know that this would have been a blow to Ridgewood if it had been built on the 15 acre campus site.”

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Two Beautiful Ridgewood Homes Eyed for Teardown by Developer

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the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Ridgewood NJ, A notice (attached) was delivered earlier this week to neighbors of two large properties on which two beautiful old homes (built-in 1898 and 1902) are located stating that they wanted permission to raze both houses, combine the properties, and build eight houses on a newly carved cul-de-sac.

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Reader says “Boswell, the NJDEP and NJ LSRP are all complicit in allowing the simultaneous deforestation of 100 acres”

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“The ENGINEER is expected to be an engineer. The boroughs have gore Boswell engineering. Boswell, the NJDEP and NJ LSRP are all complicit in allowing the simultaneous deforestation of 100 acres; leaving a veritable desert, ripe for the erosion that ensued since the winter of 2017. People HAVE been complaining to all these entities, only to be ignored or told they have done everything within their power to control what is an uncontrolled situation. They have lied on multiple occasions to many different people…all of them. And they’ve refused to accept what has been proven: arsenic is being dumped…because to accept that would shine a light on their own mistake, in having allowed the entire property to have been “remediated” all at once. The Borough of USR has tried to pass the buck by stating that NJ DEP allowed that…but Boswell, and de facto the the town, had the authority to intervene. THE FAILURE IS ON ALL LEVELS. And Toll Brothers has done nothing that it wasn’t directed to do by the authorities. This is all at the feet of the regulators.”

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DEP’s Proposed Water Rule Means More Dirty Water

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photo at Apple Ridge by Derek Michalski

the staff of the Ridgewood blog

Upper Saddle River NJ, The Department of Environmental Protection NJ Department of Environmental Protection is proposing amendments, repeals, and new rules to the Stormwater Management rules, N.J.A.C. 7:8. This is the first rule under the DEP have proposed under the Murphy Administration.  A public hearing on the proposal is today, Tuesday January 8, 2019 at 1:00 pm at the Department of Environmental Protection. Jeff Tittel, Director of the New Jersey Sierra Club released the following statement:

“DEP’s proposed rule fails to adequately protect New Jersey from flooding and non-point pollution. These rules are a step backwards, they do not deal with climate change, more frequent flooding, combined sewer overflows, and would make it easier to build pipelines. It allows for green infrastructure however it says to the maximum extension practice which is a loophole big enough to fit a bulldozer through.  The biggest problem with this rule is that it continues Christie’s rollbacks on wetlands, flood hazard, and stormwater.

“The rule calls for green infrastructure but keeps the current standards in place that do not work. It also does not effectively monitor the green infrastructure. The rules exempt existing development, they do not require retrofitting of stormwater retention and detention basin systems. It does not require enough recharge or to break up impervious cover to absorb more water. Instead, we should be treating stormwater through natural filtration into sub soils followed by vegetation. The proposed rule does not restore the 300-foot buffers, SWARPA, or calls for revegetating stream buffers or riparian corridors as a way of dealing with non-point pollution.

“DEP’s stormwater rule is seriously flawed and does not change the basic standard. The rule treats impervious cover with automobiles different with other types of impervious cover, which we believe is wrong. It does not deal with compacted soils which in parts of New Jersey are like of impervious cover. The rule also does not include any bonding required for infrastructure in case the system fails, it also does not require maintenance or monitoring.

“The model is based on dealing 100-year storm events that we are having every year. The 100-yr storm model does not work because of climate change and frequency of intense storms, we are also getting a lot more rain. Modelers are looking at 250 year and 500 year storms.  This means if you leave along the Passaic or the Raritan River, you’re going to need snorkels. Instead of moving us forward it keeps the status quo.

“Existing development is exempted from the stormwater rule, which is already the largest source of non-pollution in our state. This means a box store being built on a former shopping center or a high rise in New Brunswick will be exempted. Roofs and sidewalks are also not included under the rules, even though they contribute to extra pollution.

“Combined sewer overflow is a major problem in New Jersey, but the rule does not really address it.  CSOs are a health hazard, especially when concerned with sea level rise. The rule does not require any restrictions on holding back on water on ground or near properties. It also has no language that would clean up nitrogen and phosphorous in our water. Dilapidated storm water systems exacerbate the problem by increasing the water in combined sewers and we need funding to reduce the amount of water in sewers during major storm events. Only 5% of streams in New Jersey meet standards for being fishable, swimmable, and drinkable, mostly because of non-point solution. 65% of our streams are impacted by phosphorus. We have to retrofit urban areas for stormwater management. Things like green roofs, wet gardens can help and prevent combined sewer overflow however these methods are exempted because the rule exempts redevelopment.

“These rules do not reverse Christie’s rollbacks on stormwater, buffers, or wetlands. They still give preference for engineered controls like basins and outfall structures that can cause more erosion. DEP’s new Stormwater Management rule does not replace the nonstructural point system and requires most of BMP. Most of BMPs only work 50% of the time in ultimate situations. They do not work in areas with steep slopes or high groundwater. The rules do not deal with total suspended solids and do not have nutrient limits for nitrogen or phosphorus. They need to have those requirements in order to do TMDL.

“Non- point pollution is the biggest source of water pollution in New Jersey. This rule does not change the basic standard of the amount of water that can be adsorbed into the ground or cleanup of non-point pollution. It still has the same standards that do not work in New Jersey in the last 40 years. That is our largest source of pollution mostly because of runoff. We are seeing Barnegat Bay dying because of non point pollution and runoff. Dissolved oxygen levels are dropping due to high levels of nutrients from stormwater, resulting in algae blooms. We have to address the stormwater management and nonpoint source pollution issues in the Bay otherwise we are going to turn the Barnegat Bay into the state’s largest stormwater detention basin as the Bay continues to die.

“DEP is just taking the broken current system and adding some green amendments. This is really green cover for a rule that will cause more flooding and water pollution. The rule has a few positives but overall does nothing to change the status quo of pointless non-pollution.  It also does not deal or address storm impacts from pipelines or industrial compressor stations. The biggest source of pollution we face is nonpoint pollution and we need to retrofit our stormwater basins to protect our waterways, while revitalizing our waterfront neighborhoods and communities. DEP’s first rule is still a Christie rule that also has nothing to do with climate change, sea level rise, and will add just add more flooding. This rule just create more pointless non-point pollution,” said Jeff Tittel, Director of the New Jersey Sierra Club.